Diabetic Kidney Disease and Receiving Social Security Disability

Diabetic nephropathy

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Each one of your kidneys is composed of hundreds of thousands of filtering units that are called nephrons. Each one of these nephrons has a cluster of tiny blood vessels called a glomerulus. It is your nephrons and glomerulus that help remove waste from your body.

When you have too much blood sugar, as with diabetes, these structures can be damaged. This causes them to thicken and become scarred. Slowly, as time passes, more and more of your blood vessels are destroyed. Your kidney structures start to leak and albumin (protein) starts to pass into your urine.

Diabetic kidney disease is a type of kidney disease that takes place as a complication of diabetes. It usually occurs along with other diabetes complications, such as retinopathy (damage to the retina of your eye), blood vessel changes and hypertension (high blood pressure).

The specific cause of diabetic kidney disease is not known. Researchers believe that if you have uncontrolled high blood sugar, this will lead to the occurrence of damage to your kidneys. This is especially thought to be true when you have high blood pressure along with uncontrolled high blood sugar. However, not all people with diabetes go on to have diabetic kidney disease. Your heredity (genes) or a family history of this disease may also play a part in you developing diabetic kidney disease.

You will probably not have any signs or symptoms in the early stages of diabetic kidney disease. However, as your kidney function declines over a long period of time, signs and symptoms usually begin to appear late in the progression of the disease. Possible signs and symptoms include:

  • Persistent protein in your urine (this is the hallmark sign or symptom)
  • Swelling of your legs
  • Generalized itching
  • Unintentional weight gain that results from excess fluid accumulation
  • Excessive frothing or a foamy appearance to your urine
  • Poor appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Swelling around your eyes that usually takes place in the morning
  • Frequent hiccups
  • Headaches
  • Malaise (general sick feeling).

You or a loved one may have been diagnosed with diabetic kidney disease. Diabetic kidney disease and/or complications that have developed from it or other illnesses that you have in conjunction with this disease may have resulted in the disability of you or your loved one and be what is keeping you from being able to work.

If this is your situation, you may need help. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may be intending to apply for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has developed from diabetic kidney disease and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other illnesses that you have in conjunction with this disease. You may have already applied and been denied by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is planning on reapplying or appealing the denial, here is an established fact that you really should think carefully about that you may not have heard of. The fact of the matter is that people who have a disability lawyer standing with them like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.

Please do not wait or put this off until tomorrow. This could mean so much to you or your loved one. Contact the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

 

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