Tag Archives: Cardiovascular Disorders

Barlow’s Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Base of ventricles exposed by removal of the a...

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The center of your cardiovascular system is your heart. Your heart uses your body’s blood vessels to pump blood to all of the cells of your body. Your blood has oxygen that your cells require. Heart disease is a medical term that is used in reference to a group of diseases that develop when your blood vessels and heart are not working like they ought to.

Your mitral valve is also known as the left atrioventricular valve or bicuspid valve. It is a dual-flap valve that separates the upper (atrium) and lower (ventricle) chambers of the left side of your heart. Your mitral valve has the task of regulating blood flow from your left atrium into your left ventricle.

Barlow’s syndrome occurs when your mitral valve fails to close the way it ought to. This can lead to blood leaking back into your left atrium. This is a condition that is known as mitral valve regurgitation.

Barlow’s syndrome is the heart valve abnormality that develops most often. As much as 10% of the general population of the United States may be affected by some type of this syndrome.

No one knows the exact cause of Barlow’s syndrome. However, it is associated with many things. Some of these are:

  • Minor chest wall deformities
  • Heredity
  • Medical conditions like Marfan syndrome, scoliosis, polycystic kidney disease, Graves disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and osteogenesis imperfects.

A vast majority of the time, Barlow’s syndrome does not cause any difficulties and does not need any treatment. However, when Barlow’s syndrome does cause signs and symptoms, it can have serious, life-threatening complications.

If you do experience signs and symptoms with Barlow’s syndrome they can vary greatly from person to person. Some of the possible signs and symptoms are:

  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Depression, anxiety and panic attacks
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath or having trouble breathing that often occurs when you are lying down flat or doing physical activity
  • Migraine headaches
  • Chest pain that is not caused by a heart attack or coronary artery disease
  • An irregular or racing heartbeat (arrhythmia)
  • A cough
  • Heart murmur
  • Low blood pressure when you are lying down.
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Cranial Arteritis and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

The arteries of the face and scalp.

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Arteritis is a condition that involves inflammation in the walls of your arteries. Your arteries are the blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the rest of your body. This usually results from an auto-immune system response or an infection.

Cranial arteritis is a serious disease that is evidenced by an inflammation of the lining of the arteries in your head, specifically those arteries in your temples. These are the medium-sized arteries that supply your optic nerves, eyes and head.

Cranial arteritis may also be marked by jaw pain, headaches and blurred or double vision. Blindness and stroke may also result from cranial arteritis.

Cranial arteritis develops most often in people who are over the age of 50. This disease becomes more and more common as people age. In fact, about 20 out of every 100,000 people over the age of 50 are afflicted with cranial arteritis.

Women are twice as likely to be affected by cranial arteritis as men. Caucasians, especially those who are Scandinavians, are also affected by this disease more than people in other races.

Cranial arteritis develops when your arteries become inflamed. However, no one knows what causes this to happen. It is thought that this may be due in part to an incorrect response by your immune system. Cranial arteritis has also been associated with the use of high doses of antibiotics and severe infections.

The hallmark signs and symptoms of cranial arteritis are head tenderness and pain that are usually severe. This usually occurs in both of your temples. However, you may experience the pain in the front of your head or in one of your temples.

Other signs and symptoms of cranial arteritis may vary from person to person. Some of the possible signs and symptoms include:

  • Blurred or double vision
  • Pain in your jaw (jaw claudication) when you chew
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Pain in your tongue (tongue claudication) when chewing
  • Acute tinnitus (ringing in your ears)
  • Stiffness and pain in your arms, hips or neck that is usually more severe in the morning before you get out of bed
  • Sudden, permanent loss of vision in one eye
  • Tenderness of your scalp so that it hurts to lay your head on a pillow or comb your hair
  • Fever
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Carotid Artery Stenosis and Receiving Social Security Disability

FIG. 513 – The internal carotid and vertebral ...

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Your carotid arteries are located on each side of your neck under your jaw line. These two large blood vessels are what supply oxygenated blood to the front part of your brain and your head. This is the area of your brain where sensory, personality, motor, thinking, and speech functions are located.

Your carotid arteries are similar to your coronary arteries that supply blood to your heart in this important respect. Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) can occur on the inside of these blood vessels. This usually develops over an extended period of time from the buildup of cholesterol deposits that are called fatty and plaque substances. These substances cause your carotid arteries to narrow or constrict. This leads to the supply of blood to your brain being decreased and your risk of having a stroke is increased.

Carotid artery stenosis is a disease in which your carotid arteries become narrowed or blocked. The condition is known as carotid artery occlusion when one of your carotid arteries becomes totally blocked.

There are risk factors that may increase your likelihood of developing carotid artery stenosis. Some of these are:

  • Smoking
  • Excessive use of alcohol
  • A diet that is high in saturated fats
  • Obesity
  • Cocaine abuse
  • Insulin resistance
  • Abnormal lipids or high cholesterol
  • A family history of atherosclerosis
  • Kidney disease, especially if dialysis is required
  • Advancing age
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • A sedentary lifestyle.

During the early stages of carotid artery stenosis, you may not have any signs or symptoms. Later on, you may experience signs and symptoms of a stroke or a TIA (transient ischemic attack), which is an early warning sign of a stroke that may occur in the future. Some of the possible signs and symptoms include:

  • Sudden severe headache
  • Problems with speech and language
  • Loss of sensation
  • Loss of memory
  • Sudden difficulty with lack of coordination, loss of balance or walking
  • Weakness in an area of your body
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Confusion and/or sudden dizziness
  • Blurred vision.

You or a loved one may be suffering from carotid artery stenosis. Carotid artery stenosis and/or complications that have developed from it or other illnesses that you have along with this disease may have caused the disability of you or your loved one and be the reason why you are unable to work.

You may need help if this is the case. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may have decided to apply for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has been brought about by carotid artery stenosis and/or complications that have resulted from it or other illnesses that you have along with this disease. You may have already taken this step, and your application was denied by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is intending to reapply or appeal the denial, you really need to carefully consider this important fact that you may not be aware of. The simple truth is that people who have a disability lawyer standing with them like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.

Please do not wait or put this off until tomorrow. It is far too important to you or your loved one. Contact the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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A Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Receiving Social Security Disability

Your aorta is the largest artery in your body. Your aorta carries blood from your heart to the remainder of your body.

Your aorta is known as the thoracic aorta as it leaves your heart and then ascends, arches and descends through your chest. When your aorta gets to your diaphragm it is then called the abdominal aorta.

An aneurysm is an abnormal widening or ballooning of an area of an artery that results from weakness in the wall of your blood vessel. An aneurysm causes your blood vessel to balloon out like a weak spot on an old worn tire. This bulge can burst (rupture) and cause death at any time. There is a greater danger of rupture the larger your aneurysm is.

An aortic aneurysm is an aneurysm that develops on your aorta. Most aortic aneurysms occur on that portion that is the abdominal aorta. Less frequently, an aortic aneurysm may develop on the thoracic aorta.

Rarely, an aortic aneurysm may occur between your thoracic and abdominal aorta, involving both parts of the artery. When this happens it is called a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm.

No one knows for sure what causes a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. There are factors that can contribute to the development of an aneurysm. Some of these are:

§  High blood pressure

§  Traumatic injury

§  Difficulties with your heart’s valves

§  A family history of aortic aneurysm

§  Atherosclerosis (buildup of plaques in your arteries)

§  Using tobacco

§  Previous injury to your aorta

§  Being a white male over age 60

§  Connective tissue diseases like Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and Marfan syndrome.

A thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm often grows slowly and may not cause any signs or symptoms. This makes it difficult to detect. A thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm may start and stay small with little danger of rupture. It may also grow at a faster rate that increases the threat of rupture. Possible signs and symptoms are:

§  Clammy skin

§  Nausea and vomiting

§  Low blood pressure

§  Back pain

§  Stridor (high-pitched breathing)

§  Pain or tenderness in your chest or abdomen

§  Problems swallowing

§  Swelling in your neck

§  Hoarseness

§  Rapid heart rate

§  Hoarseness.

You or a loved one may have lived through a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. However, complications that have been brought about by it or other conditions that your have along with this aneurysm may have resulted in the disability of you or your loved one and be the reason why you are unable to work.

You may need help as a result of this. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may be thinking about applying for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has been caused by a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm and/or complications that have developed from it or other conditions that you have along with this aneurysm. You may have already applied and been denied by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is considering reapplying or appealing the denial, there is an important fact that you really ought to consider that you may not be aware of. The fact is that people who have a disability lawyer on their side like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.

Please do not delay. Contact the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Chest Pain and Receiving Social Security Disability

Chest pain is something that should always be taken with great seriousness. It can be extremely dangerous to ignore chest pain and not do anything about it.

Chest pain is not always a sign of an impending heart attack. Many times, chest pain is not related to any heart problem. Even if your chest pain is not related to your heart, it may still be a sign of a serious problem.

The effects of chest pain are different according to what is causing your chest pain. If your chest pain is heart related, it can be an indication of:

§  A heart attack can cause fullness, pressure or a crushing chest pain that lasts longer than a few minutes.

§  Pericarditis causes a sharp, piercing chest pain that is centralized.

§  Angina can cause recurrent episodes of chest pain.

§  Coronary artery spasm can cause varying degrees of chest pain.

§  Aortic dissection can cause a sudden, tearing chest pain as well as back pain.

Non-heart related chest pain can be a sign or symptom of:

§  Heartburn is a burning, painful sensation behind your breastbone. It usually follows a meal and can last for hours.

§  Pleurisy causes a sharp, localized chest pain that gets worse when you cough or inhale.

§  Panic attack can cause chest pain as well as intense fear, rapid breathing and heartbeat, shortness of breath and profuse sweating.

§  Pulmonary embolism causes a sharp, sudden chest pain that gets worse when you cough or take a deep breath.

§  Costochondritis can cause sudden, intense pain that may cause you to think you are having a heart attack. A heart attack usually involves pain that is more widespread.

§  Injured ribs or pinched nerves can cause chest pain.

§  Sore muscles usually cause chest pain when you raise your arms or twist from side to side.

§  Achalasia is a swallowing disorder that causes food to back up into your esophagus causing chest pain.

§  Esophageal spasms can cause chest pain.

§  Gallbladder or pancreas problems can cause abdominal pain that radiates to your chest.

§  Shingles can cause a sharp, burning chest pain.

Whatever is causing your chest pain may be keeping you from working. The underlying cause of your chest pain may be the reason you are disabled.

Do you need help? Do you need financial help?

Have you applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration and been denied? Are you wondering what to do now?

If you are thinking about appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration, you will need a proven disability lawyer like the one at disabilitycasereview.com to represent you in this process. This is true because people who are represented by a qualified disability attorney are approved more often than those people who do not have a lawyer.

Do not wait. Do not put this off. Contact the trustworthy disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Restrictive Cardiomyopathy and Receiving Social Security Disability

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
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Your heart is at the center of your cardiovascular system. Your heart is the organ that pumps blood to all of the cells in your body through your body’s blood vessels. Your blood has oxygen that your cells have to have.

Cardiomyopathy literally means “heart muscle disease”. It refers to the deterioration of the working of your myocardium (heart muscle).  This medical condition hinders your heart’s ability to pump blood.

There are three major types of cardiomyopathy. They are dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common form of this disease. It is when your heart’s main pumping chamber becomes dilated (enlarged), and its pumping ability becomes impaired.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a form of cardiomyopathy where your heart muscle (myocardium) becomes hypertrophied or abnormally thick. The result is that your heart may have a harder time pumping blood. This disease can also affect the electrical system of your heart.

Restrictive cardiomyopathy is the rarest kind of cardiomyopathy. It is a disease where the walls of your ventricles (lower chambers of your heart) become abnormally rigid. They do not have the flexibility to expand as they fill with blood. With the passage of time, restrictive cardiomyopathy can cause your heart to lose its ability to pump blood properly. This can then lead to heart failure.

You may experience several signs and symptoms that may be an indication of restrictive cardiomyopathy. These include:

  • Fatigue
  • Swelling of your ankles and feet
  • Poor exercise tolerance
  • A persistent cough
  • Swelling of your abdomen
  • Difficulty breathing when you are lying flat, at night and especially with exertion
  • Weight gain
  • Chest pain or pressure
  • Fainting
  • Palpitations (fluttering in your chest because of abnormal heart rhythms)
  • Bloating, nausea and poor appetite that is related to retention of fluid.

You or a loved one may have restrictive cardiomyopathy. Restrictive cardiomyopathy and/or complications that have resulted from this disease may be the reason why you or your loved one is disabled. It may be preventing you or your loved one from working.

You may need assistance if this is the case. You may need financial help.

You or your loved one may be intending to apply for the financial assistance that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by restrictive cardiomyopathy and/or complications that have resulted from this disease. You or your loved one may have already taken this step, and your application was denied by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one plans on reapplying or appealing the denial, you really ought to consider this important fact carefully. The fact of the matter is that people who have a disability lawyer standing with them like the one you will find at Social Security Home are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.

Pericardial Effusion and Receiving Social Security Disability

This images shows the appearance of a Pericard...
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Your pericardium is a tough, layered sac that surrounds your heart. Your heart slides easily inside this sac as it beats.

Pericardial effusion is a condition in which there is an abnormal amount of fluid between the pericardium and your heart. When things are as they should be, there are about 2 to 3 tablespoons of clear-yellow pericardial fluid between two layers. This lubricates your heart’s movement within the pericardium. With pericardial effusion, much larger amounts of pericardial fluid accumulate. If the pericardial effusion is small, you may have 100 milliliters of pericardial fluid. If it is large, you may have more than 2 liters of pericardial fluid.

Pericardial effusion may be a part of pericarditis. Pericarditis is a condition in which there is irritation and swelling of your pericardium. Sometimes, the cause of this condition is unknown. It is not clear how some diseases may play a role in causing pericardial effusion. However, there are some specific causes of this condition. These include:

§  Dressler’s syndrome (inflammation of the pericardium after a heart attack or heart surgery)

§  HIV/AIDS

§  Autoimmune disorders like lupus or arthritis

§  Fungal, bacterial, parasitic or viral infections

§  Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid)

§  Idiopathic pericarditis (inflammation of the pericardium from an unknown cause)

§  Certain medications like hydralazine, phenytoin or isoniazid

§  Cancer of the heart or pericardium

§  Puncture wound or trauma near your heart

§  Chemotherapy treatment for cancer

§  Uremia (waste product that is in your blood resulting from kidney failure

§  Radiation treatment for cancer if your heart is in the field of radiation

§  The spread (metastasis) of some cancers like leukemia, Hodgkin’s disease, lung cancer, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma or breast cancer.

You may not have any signs or symptoms with pericardial effusion. On the other hand, there are several signs and symptoms that may be an indication of this condition. Some of these are:

§  Low-grade fever

§  Cough

§  Overall sense of weakness or fatigue

§  Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing (dyspnea)

§  Painful breathing that is particularly prominent when you are lying down or inhaling

§  Rapid heart rate

§  Orthopnea (shortness of breath when you are lying down)

§  Dizziness or fainting

§  Chest pain that usually occurs on the left side of your chest or behind your breastbone.

You or a loved one may have or have had pericardial effusion. Complications resulting from pericardial effusion and/or other underlying conditions along with it may be why you are disabled and in need of financial help.

You or your loved one may be thinking about applying for the financial assistance that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by complications resulting from pericardial effusion and/or other underlying conditions along with it. You or your loved one may have already done this and been denied.

If you or your loved one is considering reapplying or appealing the denial, consider this. People who have a disability lawyer working for you like the one you will find at Social Security Home are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.

Hughes’ Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Hughes’ syndrome is a disorder that is characterized by blood coagulation. This causes blood clots (thrombosis) in both your arteries and veins. There can also be pregnancy-related complications such as miscarriage, preterm delivery or severe preeclampsia.

The syndrome occurs due to the autoimmune production of antibodies against phospholipid (aPL), which is a cell membrane substance. In particular, the disease is characterized by antibodies that are formed against cardiolipin (anti-cardiolipin antibodies) and β2 glycoprotein I.

Primary Hughes’ syndrome refers to this disorder when it occurs in the absence of any other related disease. It is referred to as secondary Hughes’ syndrome when it happens in conjunction with other autoimmune diseases like lupus. In rare cases, Hughes’ syndrome leads to rapid organ failure that is due to generalized thrombosis. In these cases there is a high risk of death. This is termed “catastrophic Hughes’ syndrome”.

Hughes’ syndrome is named after the rheumatologist Dr. Graham R.V. Hughes who worked at the Louise Coote Lupus Unit at St Thomas’ Hospital in London. In the 1980’s, Dr. Hughes and his colleagues provided additional understanding of this disorder.

Hughes’ syndrome is known by other names. It is also referred to as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

Anywhere from 1 to 5% of the general population is thought to have Hughes’ syndrome. It is a major concern for women as 75 to 90% of those with this disorder are women. 10 to 25% of recurrent miscarriages are due to Hughes’ syndrome. One third of all strokes that happen to people under the age of 50 are caused by this disorder. 15 to 20% of all cases of blood clots in large veins (deep vein thrombosis) are caused by Hughes’ syndrome.

The effects you have with Hughes’ syndrome depend on where blood clots form in your body or where they travel to. A clot that forms or a traveling clot (embolus) may cause these effects:

  • Stroke
  • Recurring miscarriages or stillbirths and other complications of pregnancy
  • Blood clots that travel to you lungs (pulmonary embolism)
  • Blood clots in your legs (deep vein thrombosis).

There are other less common effects that you may experience. These include:

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Bleeding
  • Neurological symptoms like headaches, seizures and dementia
  • Rash
  • Mental health problems like psychosis or depression
  • Movement disorder (chorea)
  • Sudden hearing loss
  • Cognitive problems like poor memory.

You may have Hughes’ Syndrome. As a result, you may need financial assistance.

Have you applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by Hughes’ syndrome? Were you denied?

If you are going to appeal the denial, here is something to remember. People who are represented in this process by a disability attorney like the one you will find at Social Security Home are approved more often that people without a lawyer.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Receiving Social Security Disability

The center of your cardiovascular system is your heart. Your heart pumps blood through your body’s blood vessels to all of your cells. Your blood delivers oxygen that your cells have to have.

Cardiomyopathy literally means “heart muscle disease”. Cardiomyopathy is the deterioration of the function of your actual heart muscle (myocardium).  This medical condition impairs your heart’s ability to pump blood.

Dilated cardiomyopathy is the most common form of this disease. It occurs when your heart’s main pumping chamber becomes dilated (enlarged), and its pumping ability becomes impaired.

Anyone at any age can be affected by dilated cardiomyopathy. This includes children and infants. However, it is most common in middle age.

Dilated cardiomyopathy is caused by the failure of your left ventricle, which is your heart’s main pumping chamber, to pump blood like a healthy heart does. What causes this to happen is not known in many cases. On the other hand, there are several things that can cause dilated cardiomyopathy. Some of these are:

  • Cocaine or alcohol abuse
  • A family history of cardiomyopathy
  • Autoimmune illnesses that affect your heart like rheumatoid arthritis
  • Coronary artery disease
  • Certain medications
  • Trace elements like arsenic, mercury or lead
  • Inherited disorders like muscular dystrophy
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure) that is not controlled
  • Infections that affect your heart muscle, such as Lyme disease or Chagas disease
  • Heart rhythm difficulties like tachycardia or atrial fibrillation.

At first, you may not experience any signs or symptoms with dilated cardiomyopathy. Eventually, when this disease causes cardiac arrhythmias or heart failure you will probably have signs and symptoms. These may include:

  • Ascites (swelling of your abdomen)
  • Nausea and lack of appetite
  • Palpitations (the sensation of fluttering, pounding or rapid heartbeats)
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Wheezing or coughing that is ongoing
  • Decrease in alertness or problems with concentration
  • Dyspnea (shortness of breath) when you are lying down or active
  • Sudden weight gain from retaining fluid
  • Edema (swelling) in your feet, ankles and legs
  • Dizziness, fainting or lightheadedness
  • A reduction in your ability to exercise
  • A failure to thrive in children
  • Nocturia (increase in urination at night).

You or a loved one may have dilated cardiomyopathy. This disease and/or complications resulting from it may be why you are disabled and in need of financial help.

You or your loved one may have applied for financial assistance from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by dilated cardiomyopathy and/or complications resulting from it. Were you denied?

If you or your loved one appeals the denial by the Social Security Administration, consider this carefully. People represented by a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are without a disability lawyer.

Aortic Valve Stenosis and Receiving Social Security Disability

List of images in Gray's Anatomy: V.
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The aorta is the principle artery that leaves your heart. As blood leaves your heart, it goes from you left ventricle (lower chamber) through your aortic valve into your aorta. When you have aortic valve stenosis, or aortic stenosis as it is also called, your aortic valve narrows and does not open completely like it should. This inhibits blood flow from your heart into your aorta and the rest of your body.

When aortic valve stenosis develops, your heart has to work harder to get blood to the rest of your body. In time, this makes your heart weaker. It restricts the amount of blood that your heart can pump. This causes problems like dizziness and fatigue.

Fortunately, aortic valve stenosis is a rare occurrence. Men get this disease four times more often than women. Aortic valve stenosis makes up about 7% of all congenital heart disease.

There are three main causes of aortic valve stenosis. This disease can result from a complication of rheumatic fever. Rheumatic fever may cause scar tissue to form on your aortic valve, which can cause it to narrow. The second cause is congenital heart defect. Some babies are born with an aortic valve that is already narrowed, although this is rare. The third principle cause of aortic valve stenosis is calcium buildup on your aortic valve. Deposits of calcium may build up on your aortic valve with advancing age. For many people, these deposits of calcium do not cause any problems. For others, a stiffening of the leaflets of the aortic valve occurs that narrows it.

Aortic valve stenosis can range anywhere from mild to severe. If you have mild aortic valve stenosis, you may not have any signs or symptoms. If the disease is severe, you may experience:

  • Fatigue that occurs more frequently during times of exercise or activity
  • Heart palpitations (feelings of a fluttering, rapid heartbeat)
  • Chest tightness or pain (angina)
  • Heart murmur
  • Shortness of breath that occurs more frequently with exercise or exertion
  • Weakness, dizziness or fainting with activity or exercise.

You or a loved one may have aortic valve stenosis. This disease and/or complications arising from or along with it may be why you are disabled. It may be the reason why you are unable to work.

You may need help if this is true. You may need financial assistance.

Do you or your loved one plan on applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by aortic valve stenosis and/or complications resulting from or along with it? Were you or your loved one denied?

If you are going to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration, always remember this. People who are represented by a disability lawyer like the one at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than those who are without representation.

Please do not hesitate. Contact the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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