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Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Getting Social Security

BONE MARROW: THERAPY-RELATED MYELODYSPLASTIC S...

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Myelodysplastic syndromes, as the name implies, are not one disease. Myelodysplastic syndromes are a group of disorders that are evidenced by your bone marrow not producing enough healthy blood cells.

Myelodysplastic syndromes are diseases that affect your bone marrow and blood. When your bone marrow is functioning like it should, it produces cells that are immature (blood stem cells) that go on to become mature blood cells with the passage of time. You may have been diagnosed with one of the myelodysplastic syndromes. As a result, you may meet the requirements for social security disability benefits like SSDI or SSI. The thing to do is to turn to one of the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com to check this out. The social security lawyers at disabilitycasereview.com know about what it takes to get disability benefits.

Your blood stem cells may become either a lymphoid stem cell or a myeloid stem cell. If your blood stem cell develops into a lymphoid stem cell, it will eventually become a white blood cell.

Myeloid stem cells may go on to become any one of three kinds of mature blood cells. They may develop into:

Ÿ  White blood cells, which fight against disease and infection

Ÿ  Platelets, which work to stop bleeding by leading to the formation of blood clots

Ÿ  Red blood cells, which transport oxygen and other nutrients to all of the tissues of your body.

Myelodysplastic syndromes are marked by your blood stem cells failing to become mature, healthy platelets, white blood cells or red blood cells. The blood stem cells that do not mature are known as blasts.

These blasts do not work in the way normal, healthy blood cells do. They either die soon after they get into your blood or while they are still in your bone marrow. What this results in is less space for red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells that are mature and healthy to form in your bone marrow. This, in turn, may lead to things like anemia, easy bleeding or infection.

There are several kinds of myelodysplastic syndromes. Each one of these types of the disease is characterized by not having enough kinds of healthy blood cells in your blood or bone marrow.

Myelodysplastic syndromes are caused when something occurs that disrupts the proper making of blood cells in your body. In some cases there is no known cause for myelodysplastic syndromes. In other instances, these diseases result from chemical exposure or treatments for cancer like radiation and chemotherapy.

There are some risk factors that may increase your likelihood of being afflicted with myelodysplastic syndromes. Some of these include:

Ÿ  Being male

Ÿ  Exposure to heavy metals

Ÿ  Being over the age of 60

Ÿ  Exposure to certain chemicals

Ÿ  Treatment with radiation or chemotherapy.

There are several signs and symptoms that myelodysplastic syndromes may cause. Some of these are:

Ÿ  Getting infections frequently

Ÿ  Fatigue

Ÿ  Petechiae (pinpoint-sized red spots right beneath your skin that result from bleeding)

Ÿ  Shortness of breath

Ÿ  Bruising or bleeding easily

Ÿ  A pale appearance due to anemia

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Frame Syndrome Osteomalacia and Receiving Social Security

Osteoid is a bone protein matrix that is composed mainly of type 1 collagen. Osteoid builds up due to the fact that it does not mineralize properly when you have osteoblast or mineral dysfunction that is insufficient.

Your growth plate becomes irregular, thick and wide when the newly made bone of your growth plate does not mineralize. This results in a clinical diagnosis of rickets. This is true only in the case of children because adults do not have growth plates any longer.

Osteomalacia occurs when your remodeled bone does not mineralize. Osteomalacia is a condition that takes place in all ages. Many of the hereditary causes of osteomalacia show up during childhood and result in rickets.

Osteomalacia is characterized by a softening of your bones. In fact, that is what the meaning of osteomalacia is, “soft bones.”

Soft bones have a greater tendency to bow and fracture than harder, healthy bones do. When you have osteomalacia, your bone is prone to break down faster than it can re-form.

Osteomalacia and osteoporosis are not the same thing. Osteoporosis is another bone ailment that can also lead to bone fractures. Osteomalacia results from a defect in your bone-building process. Osteoporosis is caused by a weakening of previously constructed bone.

Frame syndrome is a rare kind of osteomalacia. It is a condition that is evidenced by an enzyme defect that affects bone formation. Frame syndrome mainly involves your ribs and your hip bone (iliac crest).

There is a racial predilection with frame syndrome. This condition takes place most of the time in Caucasians and blacks.

Frame syndrome is referred to in other ways. It is also called atypical osteomalacia involving the axial skeleton and axial osteomalacia.

In order for you to build strong, healthy bones, your body must have calcium and phosphate. Frame syndrome may develop if you do not receive enough of these two minerals from your diet or your body does not absorb these minerals properly.

There are several things that may result in these problems. Some of these things are:

  • Taking certain drugs that are used in the treatment of seizures, such as Phenobarbital and phenytoin
  • Having kidney or liver diseases
  • Having a Vitamin D deficiency
  • Having certain surgeries, such as gastrectomy (removing all or a part of your stomach)
  • Having an autoimmune disease that is known as celiac disease.

There are several signs and symptoms that you may have with frame syndrome. Some of these may include:

 

  • Tenderness that occurs over the area of your lumbar spine
  • A limited range of motion in the area of your spine
  • Back pain
  • Chronic axial pain that is vague
  • Fatigue that takes place in your extremities
  • Impairment in the formation of your bone
  • Osteomalacia of your hip bone (iliac crest)
  • Osteomalacia of your rib
  • Fragility of your bones
  • Weakness in your muscles
  • Weakness in your legs and arms
  • Diffuse body pains
  • A reduction in your ability to get around
  • A waddling gait when you walk.

 

 

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Infective Endocarditis and Disability Benefits

There are four chambers and four valves that are located on the inside of your heart that are lined by a thin membrane that is known as the endocardium. Endocarditis is inflammation and/or infection of this inner layer of your heart. Endocarditis also usually affects your heart valves (prosthetic or native valves).

Infective endocarditis, which is also known as bacterial endocarditis is one of the kinds of endocarditis. Somewhere between 10,000 and 20,000 people are affected by infective endocarditis each year in the United States.

Even though infective endocarditis is not a common disease, it is a dangerous one. Even with antimicrobial therapy, infective endocarditis can result in the need for open heart surgery, stroke or even death.

Infective endocarditis is brought about by germs that get into your bloodstream, travel to your heart and attach themselves to damaged heart tissue or abnormal heart valves. In most cases of infective endocarditis, bacteria are the cause, but fungi or other microorganisms can also lead to the disease.

Sometimes, infective endocarditis may be caused by one of the many common bacteria that live in your upper respiratory tract, mouth or other areas of your body. In other instances, the organism that brings about this disease may get into your bloodstream through an infection or some other medical disorder, certain common everyday activities like brushing your teeth or chewing your food, the use of needles or catheters or having dental or respiratory tract procedures.

There are several risk factors that may increase your risk of getting infective endocarditis. These include:

  1. Any dental procedure
  2. IV drug use
  3. A congenital heart defect
  4. A prior episode of endocarditis
  5. Surgery on your urinary or gastrointestinal tracks
  6. Cardiomyopathy
  7. Having an artificial heart valve
  8. Scarring of your heart valve from rheumatic fever or other disorders
  9. Mitral valve prolapse with a good deal of abnormal backflow of blood (regurgitation)
  10. Procedures that involve your nose, ears and throat
  11. Bronchoscopy

The signs and symptoms that you may experience with infective endocarditis will vary according to the kind of the disease that you have and the cause of your infection. Possible signs and symptoms are:

 

  • Bumpy, painless nodules that appear on the soles of your feet and the palms of your hands
  • Weight loss that is unintentional
  • Joint pain or arthritis
  • Petechiae (these are tiny, purplish-red pinpoint spots of bleeding that are located under your skin)
  • A cough that is persistent
  • Headaches
  • Fever
  • Shortness of breath
  • Back or chest pain
  • Splinter hemorrhages (these are dark red lines of bleeding that are under your nails)
  • Chills
  • Oster’s nodes (these are tender spots under the skin on the pads of your fingers)
  • Night sweats.

There are other signs and symptoms that may be produced by infective endocarditis, which can only be seen and confirmed by your doctor. Some of these include:

  • Embolisms that are brought about by clumps of blood cells and infectious bacteria or fungi
  • A stroke
  • An enlarged spleen
  • A change in the quality of an existing heart murmur or a new heart murmur.

 

Are you no longer able to work because of disability that you have sustained due to complications that have resulted from infective endocarditis and/or other conditions that you have along with this disease? If this is the case, are you in need of financial help?

Have you made a request for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Has your request been denied by the Social Security Administration?

If you plan on reapplying or appealing your denial, you will need the help and advice of a disability attorney. The attorney at disabilitycasereview.com is the one to turn to.

Do not wait. Make your way to disabilitycasereview.com, without delay.

 

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Primary Thrombocythemia and Getting Disability

Primary thrombocythemia is a disease that is characterized by your body making too many blood platelets (thrombocytes). Primary thrombocythemia is one of a group of diseases of your blood and bone marrow that are known as myeloproliferative neoplasms.

If you are having signs and symptoms that are an indication of primary thrombocythemia, you may be eligible for social security disability benefits like SSI or SSDI. A good thing to do is to go to one of the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com who can help you look into the options that are available to you in regard to claiming disability benefits.

Myeloproliferative neoplasms are diseases that are evidenced by your body making an  excessive amount of cells. This group of diseases is related to and can turn into more serious disorders, such as acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

In order for your blood to clot like it ought to, you must have blood platelets. However, primary thrombocythemia is marked by blood clots (thrombus) that may take place at any point in your body. The places where these blood clots form most of the time are your hands, feet and brain.

Primary thrombocythemia, which is also referred to as essential thrombocythemia, is a disease that affects somewhere around 2 or 3 out of every 100,000 people every year in the United States.

Middle aged to elderly people are the ones who are most often affected by primary thrombocythemia, although it may affect children and young adults as well. The average age at which this disease is diagnosed is in people who are between the ages of 50 and 60.

The exact cause of primary thrombocythemia has not been determined at the present time. Around 50% of the people who are afflicted with this disease have a mutation of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene. There are other gene defects that have also been connected with primary thrombocythemia.

When the disease comes about because of an underlying disorder, it is known as secondary or reactive thrombocythemia. Secondary thrombocythemia may be caused by several different things.

You may not have any signs or symptoms at all with primary thrombocythemia. On the other hand, there are several different signs and symptoms that you may experience, which may be an indication of this disease. Some of these are:

  • Bleeding that comes from your gums
  • Lymph nodes that become enlarged
  • Weakness
  • Headache
  • Burning, redness and throbbing pain that occurs in your hands and feet (erythromelalgia)
  • Nosebleeds (epistaxis)
  • Ulcers that develop on your fingers or toes
  • Temporary changes that take place in your vision
  • A tendency to bruise easily
  • Fainting
  • Prolonged bleeding after you have had a surgical procedure or a tooth extraction
  • Numbness, redness or tingling that occurs in your hands and feet
  • Bleeding that takes place from your urinary tract, skin, gastrointestinal tract or respiratory system
  • Stools that are bloody
  • A mildly enlarged spleen
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Chest pain
  • An increased number of blood clots in your veins and arteries.
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Inflammatory Fibrous Hyperplasia and Getting SSI or SSDI

Inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is a chronic (continuing, ongoing) bone disease that is evidenced by a part of your bone developing abnormally. Scar-like (fibrous) tissue starts to replace and take the position of normal bone tissue. With the growth of your bone, the softer fibrous tissue keeps expanding, which leads to your bone becoming weakened by this process.

Deformity may occur in your bone that is infected by inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia. If deformity does develop, it will then increase the possibility of a fracture (break) occurring in your bone that has been affected. Do you have a severe case of inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia. If this is the case, you may be eligible to receive some form of social security disability benefits like SSI or SSDI. A smart move on your part would be to get in touch with one of the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com to check this out. The social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com stand ready to assist you in obtaining all of the disability benefits that are rightfully yours.

Inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is believed to begin before you are born. However, you may not realize that you are affected by inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia until you reach childhood, adolescence or adulthood.

About 7% of all benign bone tumors are due to this type of  hyperplasia. Your upper arm bone, skull, thighbone, shinbone and pelvis are the areas of your body where the disease occurs most often, but inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia may take place in any bone in your body.

In most cases, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia involves only one of your bones. In these instances, it is known as monostotic inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia. When the disease affects two or more of your bones, it is called polystotic inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia. This form of the disease may affect two of your bones in the same limb or  several bones throughout your skeleton.

Men and women are affected equally by this. It also seems to affect all races equally.

Inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is caused by a faulty (mutated) gene that has to do with your cells that produce bone. However, what causes this gene to become faulty is unknown.

What science does know is that inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is neither inherited or passed down from parent to child. There are also no known environmental or dietary factors that lead to inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia.

Inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is a disease that has no known cause. It develops spontaneously. This means that it does not result from another condition nor is it related to another disorder.

You might not have any signs and symptoms at all if your inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia is mild. If the disease is severe, however, you may experience several signs and symptoms. Some of these are:

  • Bone deformities
  • Problems with being able to walk
  • Bone sores (lesions)
  • Bone pain that grows worse with any type of activity but gets better when you rest
  • Pigmentation (an unusual skin color)
  • Bone fractures (breaks)
  • Problems with your endocrine gland
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Reactive Thrombocytosis and Disability Benefits

Reactive thrombocytosis is a disease that is marked by your body making too many blood platelets (thrombocytes). Reactive thrombocytosis is related to a group of diseases that are referred to as myeloproliferative neoplasms. Your blood and bone marrow are affected by these diseases.

Myeloproliferative neoplasms are characterized by too many cells being made by your body. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are connected to and may develop into more serious conditions, such as myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia.

In order for your blood to clot the way that it ought to, thrombocytes (blood platelets) are required. However, blood clots start to form at any point in your body when you have reactive thrombocytosis. Your hands, feet and brain are the areas where these blood clots occur most of the time.

Reactive thrombocytosis is not a disorder that takes place by itself. It is a secondary disease. If you are afflicted with an underlying ailment that has resulted in reactive thrombocytosis, the underlying ailment and/or reactive thrombocytosis may have caused your disability and may entitle you to receive social security disability benefits like SSI or SSDI. You will be making the right decision if you contact one of the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com to find out about your opportunity to get these disability benefits. The social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com know the requirements for getting a claim approved for disability benefits from the Social Security Administration. Do not wait. Contact disabilitycasereview.com, at your earliest convenience.

Reactive thrombocytosis develops secondarily to some other disorder or problem that you have. There are several things that may result in reactive thrombocytosis. Some of these include:

Ÿ  A surgical procedure

Ÿ  Acute hemorrhage or an infection

Ÿ  Anemia

Ÿ  The thinning of your bone tissue and loss of bone density (osteoporosis)

Ÿ  Medication

Ÿ  Stress

Ÿ  A deficiency of iron

Ÿ  Exercise

Ÿ  Some kinds of cancer

Ÿ  Polycythemia vera (a disease that affects other red blood cells, in addition to platelets)

Ÿ  Medications

Ÿ  Arthritis and other chronic inflammation

Ÿ  A splenectomy (surgical removal of your spleen).

There may not be any signs or symptoms at all with reactive thrombocytosis. However, there are several signs and symptoms that you may experience. Some of these are:

Ÿ  An increase in the number of blood clots in your veins and arteries

Ÿ  Stools that are bloody

Ÿ  Bleeding that comes from your gums

Ÿ  Fainting

Ÿ  Weakness

Ÿ  Headache

Ÿ  Bleeding that occurs from your gastrointestinal tract, respiratory system, skin or urinary tract

Ÿ  Dizziness or lightheadedness

Ÿ  Your spleen becoming mildly enlarged

Ÿ  Erythromelalgia (redness, burning and throbbing pain that develops in your hands and feet)

Ÿ  Chest pain

Ÿ  Epistaxis (nosebleeds)

Ÿ  Ulcers that form on your fingers and toes

Ÿ  Temporary changes that occur in your vision

Ÿ  Lymph nodes that become enlarged

Ÿ  Redness, tingling or numbness that develops in your hands and feet

Ÿ  Prolonged bleeding that takes place after you have had a surgical procedure or a tooth extraction

Ÿ  A tendency to bruise easily.

Most of the time, when the underlying problem that has caused your reactive thrombocytosis has been treated, this disorder will probably be resolved.

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Polycythemia Vera and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Polycythemia vera is one of a group of diseases that are referred to as myeloproliferative disorders. Polycythemia vera is a blood disease that is marked by your bone marrow producing an excessive amount of red blood cells.

Polycythemia vera may also cause an overproduction of other kinds of blood cells, such as platelets and white blood cells. However, with polycythemia vera, it is the excessive amount of red blood cells that results in the thickening of your blood and that are responsible for most of the issues that are related to this disease.

Polycythemia vera is referred to in other ways. It is also known as cryptogenic polycythemia, erythrocytosis megalosplenica, myelopathic polycythemia, polycythemia with chronic cyanosis, Osler’s disease, Vaquez’s disease, splenomegalic polycythemia, erythremia, polycythemia rubra vera and primary polycythemia.

Polycythemia vera is brought about by a defect (mutation) that takes place in one of your bone marrow cells that leads to difficulty with blood cell production. Researchers believe that this defect affects a protein switch that makes your blood cells grow. Scientists believe that it is a defect that is referred to as the JAK2 V617F mutation.

More than 95% of the people who are afflicted with polycythemia vera also have this defect. However, researchers have not yet discovered what causes this mutation to take place. They do think that the defect is something that you acquire rather than inherit from your parents.

There are some risk factors that may increase your likelihood of developing polycythemia vera. Some of these are:

  • Being exposed to intense radiation
  • Being older than age 60, although this disease may occur at any age of life
  • Being a man, because men are twice as likely to get this disease as women are
  • Having a family history of polycythemia vera.

If you have polycythemia vera, you may meet the medical requirements for social security disability like SSDI or SSI. The way to check on this is by looking at disabilitycasereview.com and getting the advice of one of the social security attorneys. The social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com are always ready to assist you in obtaining the disability benefits that you deserve.

In most cases, polycythemia vera does not produce any signs or symptoms at all in its early stages. However, as the disease advances, there are several different signs and symptoms that you may experience. Some of these include:

  • A feeling of bloating or fullness in your upper left abdomen that is the result of an enlarged spleen
  • Having problems with your breathing when you lie down
  • Itching that is especially prominent after you have taken a warm shower or bath
  • Headache and difficulty with your vision
  • Fatigue
  • Redness of your skin
  • Weakness, burning, numbness or tingling in your arms, hands, legs or feet
  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Purple patches or spots that show up on your skin
  • Blockage of your blood vessels that may lead to gangrene of your legs and arms, stroke or heart disease
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
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Axial Osteomalacia and Receiving Social Security Disability

Osteoblasts actively synthesizing osteoid.

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Osteoid is your bone protein matrix that is made up primarily of type 1 collagen. When there is insufficient mineral or osteoblast dysfunction, your osteoid accumulates because it does not mineralize properly.

When the newly formed bone of the growth plate does not mineralize, the growth plate becomes wide, irregular and thick. This leads to the clinical diagnosis of rickets. This is true only of children as adults no longer have growth plates. Osteomalacia develops when the remodeled bone does not mineralize. This occurs in all ages. Most of the hereditary causes of osteomalacia appear during childhood and cause rickets.

Osteomalacia is marked by a softening of your bones. In fact, the meaning of osteomalacia is “soft bones”.

Soft bones are more prone to bow and fracture than are harder, healthy bones. Your bone tends to break down faster than it can re-form in the case of osteomalacia.

Osteomalacia is not the same as osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is another bone disorder that can also result in bone fractures. Osteomalacia is caused by a defect in your bone-building process. Osteoporosis is due to a weakening of previously constructed bone.

Axial osteomalacia is a rare form of osteomalacia. It is a disorder that is marked by an enzyme defect that affects bone formation. Axial osteomalacia primarily affects your hip bone (iliac crest) and your ribs.

There is a racial predilection with axial osteomalacia. This disorder occurs predominantly in blacks and Caucasians.

Your body has to have phosphate and calcium in order to build healthy, strong bones. If your body does not absorb these minerals correctly or if you do not get enough of them in your diet, this may result in axial osteomalacia. Some of the things that may cause these difficulties include:

Ÿ  An autoimmune disease that is called celiac disease

Ÿ  Certain drugs that are used to treat seizures like Phenobarbital and phenytoin

Ÿ  Certain surgeries like gastrectomy (removing all or part of your stomach)

Ÿ  Liver or kidney diseases

Ÿ  Vitamin D deficiency.

There are several signs and symptoms that may be an indication of axial osteomalacia. Some of these are:

Ÿ  Impaired bone formation

Ÿ  Fatigue in your extremities

Ÿ  Limited range of motion in your spinal area

Ÿ  Vague chronic axial pain

Ÿ  Tenderness over your lumbar spine

Ÿ  Back pain.

You or a loved one may have axial osteomalacia. Axial osteomalacia and/or complications that have resulted from it or other conditions that you have in addition to this disorder may have caused the disability of you or your loved one and be what is preventing you from being able to work.

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Heart Muscle Disease and Receiving Social Security Disability

Source says: "Gross pathology of rheumati...

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Your heart is obviously one of the most important, if not the most important, organs in your body. In order for your cells to live and work like they ought to, they have to have the oxygen that is in your blood. Your heart is the organ that pumps your blood to all of your cells.

Heart muscle disease is the layman’s term for cardiomyopathy. Heart muscle disease has to do with the deterioration of the working of your myocardium (your actual heart muscle). This medical disease hinders your heart’s capacity to pump blood.

There are three major forms of heart muscle disease. They are:

Ÿ  Restrictive heart muscle disease – This type of heart muscle disease is characterized by your heart muscle becoming less elastic and rigid. This interferes with the expansion and filling of your heart’s ventricles with blood between heartbeats or contractions.

Ÿ  Hypertrophic heart muscle disease – This form of heart muscle disease is evidenced by abnormal thickening or growth of your heart muscle. This is especially true in regard to the muscle of your left ventricle. This leads to your heart becoming stiff, and the size of your pumping chamber may shrink. This interferes with your heart’s capacity to pump blood.

Ÿ  Dilated heart muscle disease – This kind of heart muscle disease is marked by your heart’s main pumping chamber becoming enlarged (dilated), and its pumping ability becoming hindered. Dilated heart muscle disease is the first and most common form of heart muscle disease.

The cause of your heart muscle disease has to do with the kind of heart muscle disease that you have. If you have hypertrophic or dilated heart muscle disease, it may result from your family history or heredity. The cause of restrictive heart muscle disease may not be determined, or it can be caused by other diseases in your body that involve your heart. In most cases of heart muscle disease, the cause is unknown.

However, there are some conditions that may contribute to or result in the development of heart muscle disease. Some of these include:

Ÿ  The use of chemotherapy drugs to treat cancer

Ÿ  Sustained hypertension (high blood pressure)

Ÿ  A chronic rapid heart rate

Ÿ  Metabolic disorders, such as thyroid disease or diabetes

Ÿ  Heart valve difficulties

Ÿ  Pregnancy

Ÿ  Certain viral infections that may hurt your heart

Ÿ  The excessive use of alcohol over many years.

Some people do not have any signs or symptoms in the early stages of heart muscle disease.  Signs and symptoms usually develop as heart muscle disease advances. When heart muscle disease does produce signs and symptoms, they are similar to those of congestive heart failure. Some of these are:

Ÿ  Fatigue

Ÿ  Irregular heart rhythm

Ÿ  Swelling of your lower extremities

Ÿ  Distention of your abdomen with fluid

Ÿ  Fainting, lightheadedness and dizziness

Ÿ  Breathlessness that takes place with exertion or even during rest.

The signs and symptoms of heart muscle disease usually get worse as time passes. For some people this deterioration increases quickly. Others get to a plateau and remain stable for a long time. In some cases, heart muscle disease may actually improve.

Are you incapacitated and cannot work as a result of heart muscle disease and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other underlying conditions that you have along with this disease? As a result of your disability, are you looking for financial aid?

Have you put in a claim for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Has the Social Security Administration denied your claim?

If you consider reapplying or appealing your denial, you really need the lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com to be in your corner. The lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com is capable of enabling you to receive the disability benefits that you deserve.

Do not hesitate. Contact disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Granulated Eyelids and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Eyelash

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Your eyelid is a thin fold of skin that covers and protects your eye. Your eyelid is made up of the thinnest skin on your body except for the labia minora (lips of the female external genitalia) and the fold of skin that covers the head of the penis (prepuce).

It is extremely important for the front surface of your eyeball and cornea to remain moist. Your eyelids do this all-important task for you by sweeping the secretions of your lacrimal (tear gland) apparatus and other glands over the surface at regular intervals while you are awake. Your eyelids cover your eyes to help stop evaporation while you are asleep.

Your eyelids are what permit you to blink your eyes. This blinking aids in keeping dirt and dust out of your eyes. Blinking also helps guard your eyes from injuries that are the result of foreign bodies.

Your eyelashes are a fringe of short hairs that grow on the edge of your eyelids. Your eyelashes function as a screen that keeps dust particles and insects from getting in to your eyes whenever your eyelids are partially closed.

Granulated eyelids is a chronic (long-term) disease that is marked by inflammation of your eyelids. Granulated eyelids is a common inflammatory disease. It is also evidenced by your eyelids becoming scaly and flaky.

There are two kinds of granulated eyelids. They are anterior and posterior granulated eyelids. Anterior granulated eyelids involves the outside front of your eyelid. This is where your eyelashes attach to your eyelids.

Posterior granulated eyelids affects your inner eyelid. This is where your eyelid comes in contact with your eye.

Granulated eyelids is caused by tiny oil glands not working like they ought to. These tiny oil glands are located near the base of your eyelashes. There are several disorders and conditions that may bring this about. Some of these are:

Ÿ  Allergies that include reactions to eye medications, contact lens solutions or makeup

Ÿ  Some type of bacterial infection

Ÿ  A skin condition that is evidenced by redness in your face (rosacea)

Ÿ  Oil glands in your eyelid that do not work properly

Ÿ  Dandruff of your scalp and eyebrows (seborrheic dermatitis)

Ÿ  Eyelash mites (tiny parasitic mites that infest the roots of your sebaceous glands and eyelashes).

There are some risk factors that may increase your chance of developing granulated eyelids. Some of these include:

Ÿ  Anything that weakens your immune system, such as chemotherapy, diabetes, AIDS or an organ transplant

Ÿ  Yeast infections

Ÿ  Acne

Ÿ  Seborrhea, an oily, scaly skin rash.

There are several different signs and symptoms that you may experience, which may be an indication of granulated eyelids. Some of these are:

Ÿ  The loss of your eyelashes

Ÿ  Frothy tears

Ÿ  Burning, itching

Ÿ  Crusting or flakes on your eyelashes

Ÿ  Redness, warmth and swelling of your eyelids

Ÿ  A sensitivity to light (photophobia)

Ÿ  Eyelashes that grow abnormally (misdirected eyelashes)

Ÿ  Dry eyes

Ÿ  Watery eyes

Ÿ  A blurring of your vision

Ÿ  A gritty (foreign body) feeling

Ÿ  Redness of your eye itself

Ÿ  Infections that keep on recurring

Ÿ  Your eyelids looking dark like raccoon eyes

Ÿ  A yellow or green colored fluid/discharge from your eyes.

Are you being kept from working because you have become disabled as a result of complications that have developed from granulated eyelids and/or other underlying conditions that you have besides this disease? Because of this, you may be seeking financial help.

Have you filed for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Did the Social Security Administration reject your application?

If you plan on reapplying or appealing your denial, you really ought to have the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com fighting for you. The disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com may be able to get you the disability benefits that are rightfully yours.

Do not delay. Turn to disabilitycasereview.com, now.

 

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