Tag Archives: Health

Barlow’s Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

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The center of your cardiovascular system is your heart. Your heart uses your body’s blood vessels to pump blood to all of the cells of your body. Your blood has oxygen that your cells require. Heart disease is a medical term that is used in reference to a group of diseases that develop when your blood vessels and heart are not working like they ought to.

Your mitral valve is also known as the left atrioventricular valve or bicuspid valve. It is a dual-flap valve that separates the upper (atrium) and lower (ventricle) chambers of the left side of your heart. Your mitral valve has the task of regulating blood flow from your left atrium into your left ventricle.

Barlow’s syndrome occurs when your mitral valve fails to close the way it ought to. This can lead to blood leaking back into your left atrium. This is a condition that is known as mitral valve regurgitation.

Barlow’s syndrome is the heart valve abnormality that develops most often. As much as 10% of the general population of the United States may be affected by some type of this syndrome.

No one knows the exact cause of Barlow’s syndrome. However, it is associated with many things. Some of these are:

  • Minor chest wall deformities
  • Heredity
  • Medical conditions like Marfan syndrome, scoliosis, polycystic kidney disease, Graves disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and osteogenesis imperfects.

A vast majority of the time, Barlow’s syndrome does not cause any difficulties and does not need any treatment. However, when Barlow’s syndrome does cause signs and symptoms, it can have serious, life-threatening complications.

If you do experience signs and symptoms with Barlow’s syndrome they can vary greatly from person to person. Some of the possible signs and symptoms are:

  • Dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Depression, anxiety and panic attacks
  • Fatigue
  • Shortness of breath or having trouble breathing that often occurs when you are lying down flat or doing physical activity
  • Migraine headaches
  • Chest pain that is not caused by a heart attack or coronary artery disease
  • An irregular or racing heartbeat (arrhythmia)
  • A cough
  • Heart murmur
  • Low blood pressure when you are lying down.
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Distal Myopathy and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Your proximal muscles are those that are located closest to the center of your body. These are the muscles that are located in your legs, shoulders, upper arms and pelvis.

Your distal muscles are your muscles that are situated the farthest from the center of your body. These are the muscles of your feet, hands, legs and lower arms.

Distal myopathy is a general term for a group of rare progressive genetic disorders. Distal myopathy is marked by atrophy (wasting) of your voluntary distal muscles.

Distal myopathy can begin at any age from infancy to adulthood. However, most of the forms of distal myopathy occur later in life and progress slowly.

Distal myopathy belongs to an even larger group of disorders that are known as the muscular dystrophies. The muscular dystrophies are evidenced by weakness of various voluntary muscles throughout your body. The muscular dystrophies affect different muscles and have different ages at which they begin. They also vary in inheritance patterns and severity.

The different types of distal myopathy are caused by several different genetic defects. All of these genetic defects are not known at the present time. This means that it is a disorder that you inherit from your parents. The inheritance pattern can be autosomal dominant. This means that you only have to inherit a defective gene from one of your parents in order to have the possibility of having distal myopathy. Or, this disorder can also be autosomal recessive. This means that you have to inherit a faulty gene from both of your parents in order to have the possibility of getting distal myopathy.

The primary signs and symptoms of distal myopathy are weakness and wasting (atrophy) in the muscles of your forearms, hands and lower legs. In time, however, other muscle groups may be affected.

As mentioned earlier, the signs and symptoms of distal myopathy usually progress slowly. Other possible signs and symptoms that you may experience are:

  • Frequent falls
  • Heart problems
  • Difficulty walking
  • Joint contractures
  • A waddling gait.
  • Impaired hand function
  • A weak grasp.

The specific signs and symptoms, severity and progression of distal myopathy vary greatly, even among members of the same family with this disorder. Distal myopathy does not affect your intellect.

You or a loved one may be afflicted with distal myopathy. Distal myopathy and/or complications that have developed from it or other illnesses that you have along with this disorder may have caused you or your loved one’s disability and inability to work.

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Dysthymia and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Depression is a word that can mean many things. It can refer to delusions, physical signs and symptoms, suicidal thoughts, a condition of inconsolable misery or a passing mood of discouragement or sadness. Depression is considered to be a clinical condition when it lasts long enough or is serious enough to interfere with your physical health, family life, social life and/or work.

The work dysthymia is a Greek word that means “ill humor or “a bad state of mind.” Dysthymia is one of the two major forms of clinical depression.

Most of the time, the signs and symptoms of dysthymia are considered to be fewer and less serious than those of major depressive disorder. However, the signs and symptoms of dysthymia last longer than those of major depressive disorder.

It you have dysthymia; you may also have an episode of major depressive disorder. Then, you may move from dysthymia to major depressive disorder and back to dysthymia. This is referred to as double depression.

Nearly 11 million people who are age 18 or older have chronic depression according to the National Institute of Mental Health. The National Institute of Mental Health also states that nearly 19 million people over the age of 18 experience major depression.

Dysthymia can start at any age of life. It usually begins earlier than major depressive disorder.

As with other types of depression, there is no single cause of dysthymia.  Environmental and biological factors play a part in causing dysthymia. Heredity may also be a major factor in causing this condition.

Many of the signs and symptoms of dysthymia are the same as those of major depressive disorder. However, they are not as severe as and more chronic in nature than those of major depressive disorder. Some of these signs and symptoms include:

  • Loss of energy and fatigue
  • Indecisiveness and difficulty concentrating
  • Changes in your sleeping habits
  • Sad and blue mood
  • Feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness
  • Loss of interest in things that used to bring pleasure including sex
  • Changes in appetite.

The signs and symptoms of dysthymia never seem to leave for more than a day or two before they return to drain all the pleasure out of life.

You or a loved one may have been diagnosed with dysthymia. Dysthymia and/or complications that have resulted from it or other ailments that you have besides this condition may have led to you or your loved one’s disability and inability to work.

You may need assistance if this is your situation. You may need financial help.

You or your loved one may be intending to apply for the financial assistance that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has been caused by dysthymia and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other ailments that you have besides this condition. You may have already tried this option, and your claim was turned down by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is planning on reapplying or appealing the denial, here is an important fact that you really ought to keep in mind that you may not have heard of. The fact is that people who are represented by a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who do not have a disability lawyer working for them.

Please do not delay. This could be extremely important to you or your loved one. Contact the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Brachial Plexus Neuropathy and Receiving Social Security Disability

The right brachial plexus with its short branc...

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Neuropathy is a medical term that is used for diseases or malfunctions that affect your peripheral nervous system. The term is usually used to mean the same thing as peripheral neuropathy.

Your peripheral nervous system is a vast communications network that transfers information from your brain and spinal cord (your central nervous system) to all of the other parts of your body. It also sends sensory information back to your brain and spinal cord. These are messages like your hand is burned or your foot is cold.

There are more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy that have been identified. Each one of these forms of the disorder has its own characteristic pattern of development, set of signs and symptoms and prognosis.

Brachial plexus neuropathy is one of the forms of peripheral neuropathy. It involves your brachial plexus. This is a bundle of nerves that are linked with your arm and shoulder.

Brachial plexus neuropathy is marked by the attack of intense pain in your shoulder and upper arm. This is followed by regional weakness.

Fortunately, brachial plexus neuropathy is not a common disorder. It is sometimes misdiagnosed as a problem that originates in your cervical spine.

Even though the specific causes of brachial plexus neuropathy are not known, there are several factors that may play a role in the development of this disorder. Some of these are:

  • Stretching injuries
  • Excessive exposure to toxins and radiations
  • Parasitic infestation
  • Inflammation
  • Tumors that press on your nerves
  • Trauma to brachial plexus area
  • Certain medications
  • Congenital (present at birth) abnormalities
  • Viral infections, especially those of the upper respiratory tract
  • Systemic illness like temporal arteritis or polyarteritis nodosa
  • Some vaccinations
  • Bacterial infection like typhoid or pneumonia.

The hallmark sign or symptom of brachial plexus neuropathy is the onset of intense pain in your upper arm and shoulder, although the level of pain may vary from person to person and with the severity of the disorder. Other possible signs and symptoms include:

  • Regional muscle weakness
  • Abnormal sensations like burning or tingling
  • Numbness in your hand, arm or shoulder
  • Horner syndrome (affects the nerves of your face and eye)
  • An inability to raise or extend your hand or wrist

You or a loved one may have brachial plexus neuropathy. Brachial plexus neuropathy  and/or complications that have occurred from it or other conditions that you have in addition to this disorder may have brought about the disability of you or your loved one and be the reason why you are not able to work.

As a result of this, you may need assistance. You may need financial help.

You or your loved one may be thinking about applying for the financial assistance that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has been caused by brachial plexus neuropathy and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other conditions that you have in addition to this disorder. You may have already done this and been turned down by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is considering reapplying or appealing the denial, keep this vital fact in mind that you may not be aware of. The simple truth is that people who are represented by a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who do not have a disability lawyer fighting for them.

Please do not hesitate or wait until tomorrow. This is far too important to you or your loved one. Contact the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Diabetes and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

The blue circle symbol used to represent diabetes.

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Diabetes is a disease that affects millions and millions of people in America. It is estimated that there are 20.8 million children and adults in the United States, or 7% of the world’s population, who have diabetes.

Diabetes is really a set of related diseases in which your body cannot regulate the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. Glucose in your blood is what gives you the energy to do the physical activities of daily life. Either, you cannot produce enough insulin, or you cannot use insulin properly, or both.

There are different types of diabetes. These are:

  • Type 1 diabetes – This is a type of diabetes where your body fails to produce insulin. This is the kind of diabetes that 5-10% of Americans have who are diagnosed with diabetes.
  • Type 2 diabetes – This is a type of diabetes where your body fails to properly use the insulin produced by your body.  Most Americans diagnosed with diabetes have this type.
  • Gestational diabetes – This is a type of diabetes that affects about 4% of all pregnant women.
  • Pre-diabetes – This is a condition where your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.

The effects caused by type 1 diabetes may be dramatic and come suddenly. Some of these are:

  • In association with an injury or illness like a virus
  • Extra stress can cause diabetic ketoacidosis. This is where acid levels get dangerously high in your blood and can lead to diabetic coma.
  • Dehydration
  • Nausea and vomiting.

The effects of type 2 diabetes are subtle and often attributed to obesity or aging.  In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years without knowing it. Some of the ways that you may be affected are:

  • Excessive thirst
  • Excessive urination
  • Excessive eating
  • Fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Infections
  • Blurred vision
  • Poor wound healing
  • Altered mental status.

Diabetes and/or complications resulting from it may have reached a point where you or a loved one is unable to work. Diabetes may be the cause of your disability.

If this is true, you or your loved one may need help. You may need financial assistance.

Have you or your loved one applied for financial assistance from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by diabetes and/or complications resulting from this disease? Were you or your loved one denied by the Social Security Administration?

If you or your loved one is planning on appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration, here is something that you need to keep in mind. People who are represented by a trustworthy disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than those people who are without a lawyer.

Do not wait. Contact the qualified disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Carnitine Deficiency and Receiving Social Security Disability

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Carnitine is an amino acid which helps in the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria in your cells where they are broken down and turned into energy. The mitochondria are your cells power sources. Carnitine deficiency is a metabolic state in which carnitine concentrations in your plasma and tissues are less than the levels required for normal function of your body.

Therefore, if you do not have enough carnitine present in your system, your body will not be able to use up fatty acids causing them to build up, and causing you to immediately feel weak after only a little exercise. This carnitine deficiency also leads to hypoketosis, fatty liver, muscle aches and myopathy. Myopathy is a neuromuscular disease in which your muscle fibers do not function properly.

Carnitine deficiency is much more serious in infants. This is because tissue and cell growth is rapid and the demand for energy utilization and tissue accretion leads to depletion of carnitine faster than it can be synthesized. The result can be arrhythmias and even death.

There are two general kinds of carnitine deficiency. They are:

  • Primary – This is usually a genetic defect. With primary carnitine deficiency your carnitine transporter does not function like it should. It prevents carnitine from being transported into your cells.
  • Secondary – This usually happens due to metabolic disorders in the mitochondria of your cells.

Primary carnitine deficiency is classified in two ways. They are:

  • Systemic carnitine deficiency – This affects many of your organ systems including your brain and heart.
  • Muscle carnitine deficiency – This is limited to your voluntary muscles.

Secondary carnitine deficiency results as a secondary condition from metabolic disorders in the mitochondria of your cells. Blockage of the metabolic pathways in your mitochondria leads to a build-up of acyl compounds. These compounds then bind to your carnitine and are excreted by your kidneys. This causes your carnitine levels to drop. Some of these mitochondrial disorders include cytochrome c oxidase deficiency, mitochondrial ATPase deficiency, and fatty acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies.

The effects that you experience with carnitine deficiency are determined by the cause of your condition. Some of the effects are:

  • Hypoglycemia
  • Fatty liver
  • Myoglobinuria
  • Muscle necrosis
  • Lipid-storage myopathy
  • Hyperammonemia with fatigue, confusion, muscle aches and cardiomyopathy.

You or your child with disability may have carnitine deficiency. This, along with underlying related conditions, may be causing you or your child’s disability.

You may need help. You may need financial help.

You may have applied for Social Security disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by carnitine deficiency and/or related underlying conditions. Were you or your child with disability denied?

If you are going to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration, think about this. People with a good disability lawyer like the one at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people without an attorney.

Do not delay. Contact the accomplished disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Childhood Asthma and Receiving Social Security Disability

The prevalence of childhood asthma in the Unit...

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Asthma is a chronic condition. This means it is long lasting or recurrent. Asthma affects the respiratory system by causing the airway to occasionally constrict. The airway becomes inflamed and is lined with excessive amounts of mucus.

Childhood asthma is when this condition develops in a child. Asthma can develop at any stage of life. Adults 50, 60 or even older can develop asthma.

More than 20 million people in the United States have asthma. Every day, about 60,000 miss school or work; 5,000 go to ER; and more than 1,000 are admitted to the hospital.

Childhood asthma is becoming more and more widespread. Nearly 9 million children have childhood asthma. It is the most common chronic condition in children. Childhood asthma causes more missed school, and limits more activities than any other childhood disease.

There are several different types of asthma. These include allergic asthma, cough-variant asthma, exercise-induced asthma, nocturnal asthma and occupational asthma.

In addition to their being different types of asthma, there are also different ways that asthma is classified. These are:

§  Mild intermittent. This is the mildest form of asthma. Usually, the symptoms are mild for up to two days a week and up to two nights a month.

§  Mild persistent. This is asthma where the symptoms are mild more than two times a week, but no more than once a day.

§  Moderate persistent. This involves symptoms once a day and more than one night a week.

§  Severe persistent. This is the most severe class of asthma. This involves symptoms that go on thru the day, on most days and often at night.

There are several effects that are caused by childhood asthma. These include:

§  Chest congestion

§  Chest tightness

§  Shortness of breath

§  Wheezing

§  Coughing.

There are some more signs and symptoms to look for with a baby. Some of these are:

§  Recurrent pneumonia, bronchiolitis or bronchitis

§  A rattly cough.

Your child with disability may have childhood asthma. It may be the cause of their disability.

If this is the case, you may need assistance for your child with disability. You may need financial help.

Have you applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits on behalf of your child with disability from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by childhood asthma? Was your child with disability denied?

You may be considering appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do appeal the denial, there is something that you need to be aware of.

You will need a reputable disability lawyer like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com to help your child with disability in what can be a long and trying process. This is true because people who are represented by a reliable disability attorney are approved more often than those people who do not have a lawyer.

Do not put this off. Contact the wise disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Cancer and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Cancer begins in your cells, the building blocks of your body. When things are going right, your body produces new cells as you need them. These new cells replace old cells that die.

Sometimes this process does not work the way it should. Old cells do not die when they should, and new cells develop even when you do not need them.

These extra cells may form a mass called a tumor.  Tumors can be benign or malignant.  Benign tumors are not cancer. Malignant ones are cancer.

Cancer is not one disease, but a group of diseases. Each of these diseases is characterized by cells that are aggressive (they grow and divide without respect to normal limits), invasive (they invade and destroy adjacent tissue) and sometimes metastatic (they spread to other parts of your body).

As you are probably aware of, there are many different kinds of cancer. Most of these varieties of cancer are named for where they start in your body. Lung cancer starts in your lungs. Colon cancer begins in your colon. Here are some of the various kinds of cancer:  lung cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, skin cancer and prostate cancer.

Cancer is also classified according to the type of cell that resembles the tumor. Some examples of this are carcinoma, sarcoma, germ cell tumor, lymphoma and blastic tumor.

Many times, cancer has no specific signs or symptoms. This is one reason why cancer screening is so important. However, there are some ways that cancer may affect you. Some of these are:

§  A persistent cough or blood-tinged saliva

§  Blood in your stool

§  A change in bowel habits

§  Breast lump or breast discharge

§  Unexplained anemia

§  Lumps in your testicles

§  Blood in your urine

§  A change in urination

§  Persistent lumps or swollen glands

§  An obvious change in a wart or mole

§  Hoarseness

§  Indigestion or difficulty in swallowing

§  Continued itching in your anus or genitals

§  Unusual vaginal bleeding or discharge

§  Unexpected weight loss, fever or night sweats

§  Headaches

§  Nonhealing sores

§  Back pain, pelvic pain or bloating.

Cancer may have developed to where you or a loved one is unable to work. Cancer may be the cause of you or your loved one’s disability. Cancer may be why you need financial help.

Have you or your loved one applied for Social Security disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by cancer? Were you denied?

You or your loved one may plan on appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do, remember this.

You will need a good disability lawyer like the one at disabilitycasereview.com to represent you in this process. The reason why this is true is because people who have a knowledgeable disability attorney are approved more often than those people without a lawyer.

Do not delay. Contact the accomplished disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Proximal Diabetic Neuropathy and Receiving Social Security Disability

A diagram of the Human Nervous system.

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Neuropathy is the term that is used to refer to illnesses or injuries that affect your nerves or nerves cells. This may involve your central nervous system or your peripheral nervous system.

Your peripheral nervous system refers to your nerves that are not in your spinal cord and brain. It is the expansive communications network that transmits information from your brain and spinal cord (the central nervous system) to every other part of your body.

Peripheral neuropathy is any kind of illness or injury that affects your peripheral nervous system. It distorts and sometimes interrupts messages between your brain and the remainder of your body like static on a telephone line.

There are more than 100 forms of peripheral neuropathy. It is an ailment that affects over 20 million people in the United States.

Diabetes damages your nerves. One of the complications of diabetes is damage to the nerves that allow you to feel sensations like pain. This common complication of diabetes is known as diabetic neuropathy.

Proximal diabetic neuropathy is one of the kinds of diabetic neuropathy. It affects nerves that are closer to your hips or shoulders. Proximal diabetic neuropathy affects your legs most of the time, but it can also affect nerves in your arms and abdomen.

Proximal diabetic neuropathy is caused primarily by prolonged exposure to high blood sugar levels, which can result in damage to delicate nerve fibers. It occurs more frequently in older adults and those who have type 2 diabetes.

Most of the time, the signs and symptoms of proximal diabetic neuropathy take place on one side of your body. However, they may also spread to the other side of your body. Signs and symptoms may include:

  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Problems with rising from a sitting position
  • Sudden, severe pain in your thigh and hip or buttock
  • If your abdomen is affected, abdominal swelling
  • Eventual weak and atrophied thigh muscles.

You or a loved one may be afflicted with proximal diabetic neuropathy. Proximal diabetic neuropathy and/or complications that have been caused by it or other ailments that you have in addition to this disorder may have led to you or your loved one’s disability and not being able to work.

If this is the case, you may need help. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may be considering applying for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has developed from proximal diabetic neuropathy and/or complications that have resulted from it or other ailments that you have along with this disorder. You may have already taken this step, and your application was denied by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one has decided to reapply or appeal the denial, you really ought to think about this important fact. The simple truth is that people who have a disability attorney in their corner like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability lawyer.

Please do not hesitate. Contact the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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A Corneal Dystrophy and Receiving Social Security Disability

Human eye.

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Your cornea is your eye’s outermost layer. It is the clear, dome-shaped surface that covers the front of your eye.

Even though your cornea is clear and does not seem to have substance, it is really a highly organized group of proteins and cells. Your cornea, unlike most body tissues, does not have any blood vessels to protect it against infection or nourish it. Your cornea gets its nourishment from the tears and aqueous humor that fills the chamber behind it.

Your cornea has to stay transparent in order for it to refract light like it should. If even the tiniest blood vessels are in your cornea, this process may be interfered with. All of the layers of your cornea have to be free of any opaque or cloudy areas in order for you to have good vision.

Your cornea is arranged in five basic layers. They are:

  • Epithelium – This is your cornea’s outermost layer, and it comprises about 10% of your tissue’s thickness.
  • Bowman’s layer – This layer lies directly below the basement membrane of your epithelium.
  • Stroma – This layer is beneath Bowman’s layer, and it makes up about 90% of your cornea’s thickness.
  • Descemet’s membrane – This layer is under your stroma, and it functions as a protective barrier against injuries and infections.
  • Endothelium – This is the extremely thin, innermost layer of your cornea.

There are several disorders and diseases that affect your cornea. Some of these are ocular herpes, pterygium, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, keratoconus, iridocorneal endothelial syndrome, shingles, dry eye, corneal infections, allergies and conjunctivitis (pink eye).

A corneal dystrophy is one of a group of various disorders that affect your cornea. A corneal dystrophy is a condition in which one or more layers of your cornea lose their normal clarity because of a buildup of cloudy materials. There are over 20 corneal dystrophies that affect the layers of your cornea.

The signs and symptoms of a corneal dystrophy that you experience will vary depending on the location and extent of your corneal damage. Possible signs and symptoms include:

  • Lazy eye
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Blurred vision
  • Eye pain
  • Episodic eye pain
  • Blindness.

You or a loved one may have a corneal dystrophy. A corneal dystrophy and/or complications resulting from or other disabling conditions that you have along with this disorder may have led to you or your loved one’s disability and need for financial assistance.

You or your loved one may intend to apply for the financial assistance that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by a corneal dystrophy and/or complications resulting from or other disabling conditions that you have along with this disorder. You or your loved one may have already done this and been turned down by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one plans on reapplying or appealing the denial, remember this. People who are represented by a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who do not have a disability lawyer standing with them.

Please do not delay. Contact the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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