Tag Archives: Muscle

Dystrophia Myotonica and Receiving Social Security Disability

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Muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic (hereditary) muscle diseases. Progressive muscle weakness in your muscles that enable your body to move is what characterizes these diseases.

Muscular dystrophy involves incorrect or missing information in your genes. Proteins are stopped from being produced that are needed for healthy muscles. Muscular dystrophy is a disease that is passed down to you from your parents. It is not something that you can catch from someone who has it. Muscular dystrophy is not contagious.

Muscular dystrophy weakens your muscles with the passage of time. You may gradually lose your ability to do things that most people do not even think about, like sitting up or walking. These difficulties may have originated when you were a baby, or they can start in childhood, adolescence or adulthood.

There are several different kinds of muscular dystrophy that affect different muscle groups in different ways. Dystrophia myotonica is one of the forms of this disease.

Dystrophia myotonica is the most common kind of muscular dystrophy that starts in adulthood. It usually develops between the ages of 20 and 40. However, there is an infantile form of dystrophia myotonica. In fact, this disease can begin at any age from birth to old age.

Until the 1980s, there was not much known about what causes any type of muscular dystrophy. Then, researchers discovered that muscular dystrophy is caused by a defective gene. Not enough dystrophin is made because of the faulty gene. Dystrophin is a protein that helps keep your muscle cells intact. In the case of dystrophia myotonica, there is a repeated section of DNA on either chromosome 3 or chromosome 19.

The progression of dystrophia myotonica is slow. The disease can span 50 to 60 years.

The first signs and symptoms of dystrophia myotonica are usually generalized weakness and loss of muscle tissue (muscle wasting) in your hands, forearms, lower legs, face and neck. This is in conjunction with difficulty relaxing muscles after contracting them. Other signs and symptoms that you may experience are:

  • Mild diabetes
  • Difficulty breathing and swallowing
  • Frontal balding in men
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Problems with your digestive tract like diarrhea and constipation
  • Daytime sleepiness
  • Difficulty sleeping well at night
  • Clouding of the lenses of your eyes (cataracts).

You or your loved one may have decided to apply for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has resulted from dystrophia myotonica and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other ailments that you have in conjunction with this disease. You may have already applied and been denied by the Social Security Administration.

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MD and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

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Most people have heard of MD (muscular dystrophy) because of the Labor Day telethon that is held each year. However, other than this, most people do not know much about MD.

 

MD refers to more than one single disease. MD is used for a group of hereditary (genetic) muscle diseases that result in progressive muscle weakness in the muscles that enable your body to move.

People with MD have incorrect or missing information in their genes that keep them from producing the proteins that are required for healthy muscles. Because MD is congenital (something you are born with), it is not something that is contagious, that you can get from someone who has it.

MD weakens your muscles over time. Children, teens and adults with this disease may gradually lose their ability to do the things that most people take for granted, like walking or sitting up. The muscle problems resulting from MD can begin when you were a baby, or they may start later on. Some adults acquire MD.

There are several different kinds of MD that can affect different muscle groups in different ways. Some of these include Duchenne MD, distal MD, Becker’s MD, myotonic MD, congenital MD, limb-girdle MD, facioscapulohumeral MD, oculopharyngeal MD and Emery-Dreifuss MD.

Somewhere around 250,000 children and adults have MD in the United States. Some forms of MD like Becker’s and Duchenne affect primarily boys.

As mentioned earlier, MD is a genetic (inherited) disease. This means that it is passed down through families. It is caused by defects (mutations) that occur in the genes that are passed down to you from your parents. Each one of the various kinds of MD is caused by a genetic mutation that is particular to that form of the disease.

There are many signs and symptoms that you may experience with MD. They will depend on the type of MD that you have. Some possible signs and symptoms include:

  • Frequent falls
  • Progressive muscular weakness or wasting
  • Poor balance
  • Pain in your calf
  • Drooping eyelids
  • Walking difficulty or waddling gait
  • The inability to walk
  • Gonadal atrophy
  • Muscle contractures
  • Scoliosis
  • Respiratory problems
  • Limited range of movement.

Some types of MD can also affect your heart. These kinds of MD can cause arrhythmias or cardiomyopathy.

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Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Receiving Social Security Disability

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Cerebral palsy designates a group of chronic conditions that affect posture, body movement, muscle coordination and balance. Cerebral palsy results from some kind of brain damage or malformation that occurs either during pregnancy, during delivery or shortly after delivery.

There are several different forms of cerebral palsy. Each one is classified by the way that it affects you.

Spastic cerebral palsy is one of the kinds of cerebral palsy. Spastic cerebral palsy is characterized by having one or more tight muscle groups that limit your movement. It may cause you to have jerky and stiff movements. You may have a difficult time moving from one position to another, and you may have a hard time holding or letting go of an object.

Spastic cerebral palsy is the most common form of cerebral palsy. About 80% of all the cases of cerebral palsy are spastic cerebral palsy.

Spastic cerebral palsy is caused by an abnormality in or an injury to your cerebrum, which is the largest part of your brain. This is the part of your brain that controls sensation and voluntary motor function. Spastic cerebral palsy affects your movement, but the underlying difficulty is in your brain, not your muscles. Head injury and certain illnesses can also cause spastic cerebral palsy.

For many years, researchers and doctors thought that spastic cerebral palsy was caused by a lack of oxygen during birth. Now, it is believed that only a few cases are caused by problems during labor and delivery. With most cases of spastic cerebral palsy that are congenital (present at birth), doctors do not fully understand what has caused it.

There are some possible causes of spastic cerebral palsy that have been identified. Some of these include:

  • Disturbance to brain circulation before birth
  • Abnormal brain development before birth
  • Severe jaundice in newborns
  • Maternal infection during pregnancy.

There can be a wide range of signs and symptoms with spastic cerebral palsy. These signs and symptoms can be anywhere from mild to severe. Some of these include:

  • Joint contracture (joints that are tight and do not open all the way up)
  • Muscle weakness or loss of movement in a group of muscles (paralysis)
  • Muscles that are extremely tight and will not stretch
  • Abnormal walk or gait that is marked by your knees touching or being crossed, walking on your toes, your legs making “scissors” movements and your arms tucked in toward your sides.
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Glycogenosis Type V and Receiving Social Security Disability

Glycogen, a branched polysaccharide

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Glycogenosis type V is one of the glycogen storage diseases. What this means is that there is an inborn error of metabolism. It is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder. Glycogenosis type V is evidenced by a deficiency in glycogen debranching enzymes.

Glycogenosis type V is a rare disorder. It takes place in around 1 out of every 100,000 live births in the United States.

Glycogenosis type V is a genetically linked metabolic disorder involving the enzymes that regulate glycogen metabolism. This is in common with other glycogen storage diseases. These enzymes affect synthesis or the processing of glycogen breakdown within your liver, ahaha muscles and other cell types. The process is halted if any one of these enzymes is faulty and does not finish its step. A different enzyme is involved in each step of the process. The type of glycogen storage disease that you have is determined by which particular enzyme is defective.

Glycogenosis type V is marked by a problem with glycogen storage in your body. There is an abnormal build up of glycogen in your muscle tissue. Glycogenosis type V usually starts in early childhood.

Glycogenosis type V is an hereditary (inherited) or genetic condition. As mentioned at the beginning, the pattern of inheritance is what is known as autosomal recessive. This means that you have to inherit a defective (mutated) gene from each one of your parents in order to have the possibility of having glycogenosis type V.

The dominant form of the disorder is rare. Glycogenosis type V is caused by a deficiency of myophosphorylase. This is the muscle isoform of the enzyme glycogen phosphorylase. Myophosphorylase helps break down glycogen into glucose so that it can be used within your muscle cells.

There are several signs and symptoms that you may experience that may be an indication that you have glycogenosis type V. Most of these signs and symptoms are related to exercise. Possible signs and symptoms are:

  • Painful cramps
  • Early fatigue
  • Exercise intolerance with myalgia (muscular pain)
  • Weakness of exercising muscles
  • Myoglobinuria (the presence of myoglobin in your urine).

You may show substantial muscle loss and progressively increasing weakness as you age. The signs and symptoms of many people get worse after middle age due to muscle wasting.

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Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis and Receiving Social Security Disability

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a disorder that is characterized by episodes of extreme muscle weakness. These episodes usually involve a temporary inability to move muscles (paralysis) in your arms and legs. It is also evidenced, sometimes, by higher than normal levels of potassium in your blood.

Most of the time, hyperkalemic periodic paralysis usually starts during infancy or early childhood. These episodes have a tendency to increase in frequency until around the age of 25. Then, they may decrease in frequency.

Muscle strength does improve between episodes of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. However, many people continue to have myotonia (mild stiffness). This is especially true in regard to the muscles of the hands and face.

Fortunately, hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is rare. It is estimated to occur in 1 in 200,000 people in the United States. This disorder affects men more often than it does women.

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is an inherited disorder. It is caused by defects (mutations) that occur in the SCN4A gene. The pattern of inheritance is what is referred to as an autosomal dominant pattern. What this means is that you only have to inherit the defective gene from one of your parents in order to have the possibility of getting hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.

The hallmark sign or symptom of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is paralysis (loss of muscle movement) or muscle weakness that comes and goes. These attacks (episodes) usually last for one to two hours, but they can last for an entire day.

There are some characteristics of the paralysis or weakness. Some of these are:

  • Most often takes place while resting after activity
  • Comes and goes
  • May happen on awakening
  • Usually lasts for 1 to 2 hours
  • Most often takes place in your hips and shoulders
  • May also involve your legs and arms but does not affect the muscles of your eyes and those that help you to swallow and breathe.

There are triggers that may lead to an episode of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. These include:

  • Exposure to cold
  • Fasting (not eating)
  • Taking medications that contain potassium or eating small amounts of potassium-rich foods
  • Resting after exercise or other activity.
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Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

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Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Myofascial pain syndrome is a chronic kind of muscle pain. The pain that results from myofascial pain syndrome is located around sensitive points in your muscles that are known as trigger points.

These trigger points may be painful to the touch. The pain may then radiate throughout your affected muscle.

Nearly all people have occasional muscle pain at one time or another that goes away in a few days. However, if you have myofascial pain syndrome, you experience pain that gets worse or will not go away. In some cases, the pain may be quite severe.

The pain that is associated with myofascial pain syndrome that results from trigger points has been linked to many different kinds of pain. Some of these are pelvic pain, leg pain, jaw pain, arm pain, low back pain, neck pain and headaches.

Women are more likely than men to develop myofascial pain syndrome, but the reason for this is not clear. Also, myofascial pain syndrome is more common in middle-aged adults than in younger adults. The reason is thought to be that the muscles of younger adults are better able to deal with strain and stress than those of older adults.

Myofascial pain syndrome may be caused by a muscle injury or strain on a tendon, ligament, muscle group or individual muscle. Other possible causes of myofascial pain syndrome are:

  • Repetitive motions
  • A lack of activity from having something like a broken arm or leg
  • An injury to an intervertebral disc
  • Medical conditions like stomach irritation or a heart attack
  • General fatigue.

There are several signs and symptoms that you may experience with myofascial pain syndrome. These include:

  • Pain that worsens or persists
  • A problem with sleeping because of pain
  • Deep, aching pain in one of your muscles
  • An area of tension in your muscle that may feel like a tight spot or knot and that may be very sensitive to touch
  • Joint stiffness that is near your affected muscle
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Fatigue
  • Behavioral disturbances
  • Depression.

 

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Landouzy-Dejerine Dystrophy and Receiving Social Security Disability

Muscular dystrophy is also referred to as (MD). The term muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic, hereditary muscle diseases. These diseases cause progressive muscle weakness in the muscles that enable your body to move.

If you have muscular dystrophy, you have incorrect or missing information in your genes. Because of this, the proteins that are needed for healthy muscles are not made. Muscular dystrophy is a disease that you are born with (congenital). You cannot catch it from someone else.

Muscular dystrophy causes your muscles to weaken over time. You may gradually lose your ability to do things that are taken for granted by most people. These are things like sitting up or walking. The problems caused by muscular dystrophy can start anywhere from infancy to adulthood.

There are several different kinds of muscular dystrophy that affect different muscle groups in different ways. Landouzy-Dejerine dystrophy is one of the forms of this disease.

Landouzy-Dejerine dystrophy is evidenced by progressive muscle weakness and wasting (loss of muscle tissue). This usually originates in childhood or by the age of 20. However, these signs and symptoms may not be revealed until later in life or not at all. The signs and symptoms of Landouzy-Dejerine dystrophy usually progress very slowly.

Not much was known about what causes any form of muscular dystrophy until the 1980s. Then, researchers discovered that it is caused by a defective (faulty) gene. There is an insufficient amount of dystrophin that is produced because of this faulty gene. Dystrophin is a protein that helps keep your muscle cells intact.

When it starts, Landouzy-Dejerine dystrophy affects the muscles around your lower legs, upper arms, shoulders, mouth and eyes. Later, you may experience weakness in your abdominal muscles and sometimes your hip muscles.

There are other signs and symptoms that you may have with Landouzy-Dejerine dystrophy. Some of these are:

  • Shoulder deformities
  • Problems with pronouncing words
  • Angry or depressed facial expression
  • An inability to whistle
  • Decreased facial expression
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Difficulty walking
  • Drooping of your eyelids
  • Hearing loss
  • Difficulty raising your arms.

You or a loved one may be afflicted with Landouzy-Dejerine dystrophy. Landouzy-Dejerine dystrophy and/or complications that have been caused by it or other disorders that you have besides this disease may have led to the disability of you or your loved one and be what is keeping you from being able to work.

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Distal Myopathy and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Your proximal muscles are those that are located closest to the center of your body. These are the muscles that are located in your legs, shoulders, upper arms and pelvis.

Your distal muscles are your muscles that are situated the farthest from the center of your body. These are the muscles of your feet, hands, legs and lower arms.

Distal myopathy is a general term for a group of rare progressive genetic disorders. Distal myopathy is marked by atrophy (wasting) of your voluntary distal muscles.

Distal myopathy can begin at any age from infancy to adulthood. However, most of the forms of distal myopathy occur later in life and progress slowly.

Distal myopathy belongs to an even larger group of disorders that are known as the muscular dystrophies. The muscular dystrophies are evidenced by weakness of various voluntary muscles throughout your body. The muscular dystrophies affect different muscles and have different ages at which they begin. They also vary in inheritance patterns and severity.

The different types of distal myopathy are caused by several different genetic defects. All of these genetic defects are not known at the present time. This means that it is a disorder that you inherit from your parents. The inheritance pattern can be autosomal dominant. This means that you only have to inherit a defective gene from one of your parents in order to have the possibility of having distal myopathy. Or, this disorder can also be autosomal recessive. This means that you have to inherit a faulty gene from both of your parents in order to have the possibility of getting distal myopathy.

The primary signs and symptoms of distal myopathy are weakness and wasting (atrophy) in the muscles of your forearms, hands and lower legs. In time, however, other muscle groups may be affected.

As mentioned earlier, the signs and symptoms of distal myopathy usually progress slowly. Other possible signs and symptoms that you may experience are:

  • Frequent falls
  • Heart problems
  • Difficulty walking
  • Joint contractures
  • A waddling gait.
  • Impaired hand function
  • A weak grasp.

The specific signs and symptoms, severity and progression of distal myopathy vary greatly, even among members of the same family with this disorder. Distal myopathy does not affect your intellect.

You or a loved one may be afflicted with distal myopathy. Distal myopathy and/or complications that have developed from it or other illnesses that you have along with this disorder may have caused you or your loved one’s disability and inability to work.

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Exercise-Induced Compartment Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Exercise-induced compartment syndrome is an exercise-induced, uncommon neuromuscular disorder that is evidenced by pain, swelling and potential disability in the muscles of your arms or legs that are affected. It is also marked by your pain subsiding when you are at rest.

Exercise-induced compartment syndrome usually develops in experienced athletes who take part in sports that require repetitive movements like running, power walking, biking, or swimming. However, this disorder can occur in anyone.

There are many groupings or compartments of blood vessels, nerves and muscles in your arms and legs. Each one of these compartments is encased by a thick layer of connective tissue that is known as fascia. Fascia is also what holds the tissues in place in each of these compartments, and it supports these compartments. Fascia does not have the capacity to stretch.

If you have exercise-induced compartment syndrome, the pressure of your tissue inside of a compartment rises to an excessively high level. However, the tissues that are inside of that compartment are not able to expand adequately with this increased pressure. Your nerves and blood vessels become compressed and blood flow decreases. This results in an inadequate amount of oxygen-rich blood (ischemia). This, in turn, leads to damage to your nerves and muscles. This is what exercise-induced compartment syndrome is.

The reason why exercise causes this increased pressure in some people is not known. Theories have been set forth that having increased muscle size, thick or inelastic fascia, biomechanics (how you move) or high pressure in your veins may play a role in causing this disorder.

The principle sign or symptom of exercise-induced compartment syndrome is pain that begins with exercise activity and gets increasingly worse and then goes away when you rest. Other signs and symptoms of this disorder are:

  • Aching, burning or cramping pain in your affected limb while you exercise
  • Numbness or tingling in your affected limb
  • Weakness of your limb that is affected
  • Tightness in your affected limb
  • In severe cases, you may have foot drop if the nerves of your leg are affected
  • Sometimes, there is swelling or bulging because of a muscle hernia.

Exercise-induced compartment syndrome occurs most often in your lower legs. Usually, this involves both of your legs and not just one of them. However, it can also occur in your thighs, upper arms, hands and forearms.

You or a loved one may have exercise-induced compartment syndrome. This disorder and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other conditions that you have in conjunction with this disorder may have resulted in you or your loved one’s disability and being unable to work.

You may need help if this is true. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may be planning on applying for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has developed from exercise-induced compartment syndrome and/or complications that have been caused by it or other conditions that you have in conjunction with this disorder. You may have already applied and been denied by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is thinking about reapplying or appealing the denial, remember this important fact that you may not know about. The simple truth is that people who have a disability lawyer fighting for them like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.

Please do not hesitate. Contact the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Benign Pseudohypertrophic Muscular Dystrophy and Receiving Social Security Disability

X-linked recessive inheritance: Affected boys ...

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Muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic, hereditary muscle diseases. These diseases result in progressive muscle weakness in the muscles that enable your body to move.

If you have muscular dystrophy, you have missing or incorrect information in your genes. This stops you from producing the proteins that you need for healthy muscles. Muscular dystrophy is a congenital disease. This means that it is something you are born with. It is not something that is contagious.

Muscular dystrophy weakens your muscles as time goes by. This disease causes you to gradually lose your ability to do the things that most people take for granted like walking or sitting up.

The difficulties resulting from muscular dystrophy may have begun when you were a baby, or they may have started in childhood, adolescence or adulthood.

There are several different kinds of muscular dystrophy that affect different muscle groups in different ways. Benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy is one of the forms of this disease.

Benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy is characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness of your legs and pelvis. It is a form of dystrophinopathy where there is not enough dystrophin made in your muscle cells. This leads to instability in the structure of your muscle cell membrane.

Benign pseudohypertrophic dystrophy is like Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The main difference is that its progression of muscle weakness occurs at a much slower rate. It is also far less predictable than Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy is a disease that nearly always affects boys. It is rare when a girl is affected by this disease.

The signs and symptoms of benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy usually start in adolescence or adulthood. Possible signs and symptoms are:

  • Frequent falls
  • Muscle deformities like the enlargement of your calf muscles
  • Skeletal deformities in your back and chest
  • Slowly progressive muscle weakness as in difficulty walking, running, jumping or hopping
  • Wasting (loss of muscle mass)
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Loss of coordination and balance
  • Heart disease
  • Walking on toes
  • Fatigue
  • Cognitive problems that do not get worse with time
  • Walking on toes.

You or a loved one may have benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy. Benign pseudohypertrophic muscular dystrophy and/or complications that have been caused by it or other conditions that you have in addition to this disease may have brought about the disability of you or your loved one and be what is preventing you from working.

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