Tag Archives: Schizophrenia

Mental illness and SSDI what do I need to know?

Recently on our legal forum a user asked, “I have suffered from PTSD and depression for several years following my tour in Iraq. I have tried to get a job but can’t seem to function in a work environment due to my mental illness. I am wondering whether I might qualify for disability benefits. I hate the thought of being on the government dole, but I don’t have any other options. Can you help me?”

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Childhood Schizophrenia and Receiving Social Security Disability

Eugen Bleuler (1857–1939) coined the term &quo...

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Schizophrenia is a mental disorder as described by psychiatric diagnosis. It is a severe, disabling, chronic brain disorder. Schizophrenia is evidenced by hearing voices that other people do not hear, a belief that other people are broadcasting their thoughts to the world or being convinced that other people are plotting to harm them.

This leads to people being fearful and withdrawn who have schizophrenia. Trying to have relationships with other people is also difficult.

There has been debate as to whether schizophrenia is a single disorder or a number of discrete syndromes because of the many possible combinations of signs and symptoms with this mental disorder.

Paul Eugen Bleuler, a Swiss psychiatrist, was the first to use the term, “schizophrenia” in 1908. Actually, he used the term, “the schizophrenias” because of the debate about the disorder.

Schizophrenia affects about 1.1% of the population of the United States that is age 18 and older in any given year. This means that well over 3 million people are affected by schizophrenia in the United States every year.

Schizophrenia appears equally in men and women. It usually appears in men at an earlier age than in women. The peak ages for onset in men are 20-28. In women, the peak ages are 26-32. It is rare in older adults.

Childhood schizophrenia is very much like the adult form of the mental disorder. The difference is that it develops earlier. This can happen even before adolescence. Schizophrenia has a huge impact on the ability of a child to function.

Childhood schizophrenia is also much rarer than the adult form of the disorder. It is estimated to affect 1 in 40,000 children. When it does begin, it usually starts between age 7 and adolescence.

Your child with disability will probably lose interest in activities, becomes withdrawn and develop distorted perception and thinking. These effects can go on for a good while before progressing.

Other ways that childhood schizophrenia may affect your child with disability is causing paranoia, hallucinations and delusions. He or she may often fear that people are plotting to hurt them. Your child with disability may believe that others are in control of their thoughts, and they will probably have blunted emotions.

Your child with disability may have childhood schizophrenia. This may be the cause of their disability.

You may have tried to get financial help for your child with disability by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by childhood schizophrenia. Was your child with disability denied?

If you are thinking about appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration, there is something that you should know. People who are represented by a knowledgeable disability attorney like the one at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than those people who do not have a lawyer.

This is something of great importance for your child with disability. Contact the good disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Paranoid Personality Disorder and Receiving Social Security Disability

Personality disorder refers to a kind of mental illness in which the way that you relate to others, perceive situations and the pattern of your thinking are dysfunctional. Personality disorder is a broad, inclusive term because there are many different, specific kinds of personality disorders.

Personality disorder describes a rigid and potentially self-destructive or self-denigrating way of thinking and behaving no matter what the situation is. This leads to hurting your ability to carry out routine functions at work, social situations or school. Personality disorder causes distress in your life.

You may or may not know that you have a personality disorder. This is because the way that you think and act is probably the way you think it should be. You may feel like others are responsible for your circumstances.

Paranoid personality disorder (PPD) is one of several personality disorders. It should not be confused with paranoid schizophrenia, which is a chronic mental illness that is characterized by beliefs that have no basis in reality (delusions) and hearing things that are not real (auditory hallucinations).

Paranoid personality disorder is characterized by paranoia. Paranoia is an exaggerated or unfounded mistrust of others that can reach delusional proportions. People with paranoid personality disorder question the motives of others and believe that people in general or certain individuals are “out to get them”.

It has been estimated that as many as 4.5% of the general population have paranoid personality disorder. It is more common in males than females.

The primary indication of paranoid personality disorder is a deep suspicion and distrust of other people and usually not being able to admit those negative feelings being directed at others. Other signs and symptoms of PPD are:

  • A poor self image
  • Detachment
  • Not being able to work together with other people
  • Hostility
  • Deep suspicion and concern that other people have hidden motives
  • Being socially isolated
  • A believe that other people will use and exploit them
  • Holding grudges and being unforgiving
  • Being hypersensitive and taking criticism poorly
  • An inability to relax
  • Having recurring, unfounded suspicions that their lover or spouse is being unfaithful.

You or a loved one may have paranoid personality disorder. This disorder and/or complications resulting from or other conditions along with PPD may be the reason that you or your loved one is disabled and in need of assistance.

You or your loved one may have applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by paranoid personality disorder and/or complications resulting from or other conditions along with PPD? Were you or your loved one denied?

If you decide to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration, always remember. People who are represented by a disability lawyer like the one at Social Security Home are approved more often than those without an attorney.

Catatonic Schizophrenia and Receiving Social Security Disability

Schizophrenia refers to a psychiatric diagnosis that describes a mental disorder. It is a severe, chronic and disabling brain disorder. It is evidenced by a belief that other people are broadcasting their thoughts to the world, hearing voices that other people do not hear or being sure that other people are plotting to hurt them.

The result is that people with schizophrenia may be fearful and withdrawn. They may have problems with relationships with other people.

It has been debated as to whether schizophrenia is a single disorder or several discrete syndromes. This is because of the many possible combinations of signs and symptoms with schizophrenia.

It was the Swiss psychiatrist, Paul Eugen Bleuler, who originated the term, “schizophrenia” in 1908. In fact, Bleuler used the term, “the schizophrenias” because of the debate that was mentioned above.

Catatonic schizophrenia is one of the different forms of schizophrenia. It is marked by extremes of behavior. You may involuntarily imitate the movements or sounds of other people and exhibit hyperactive or overexcited motion. Or, you may not be able to move, respond or speak.

Fortunately, catatonic schizophrenia is rare. This is due to greatly improved treatment of schizophrenia.

No one knows what causes catatonic schizophrenia. Growing evidence indicates that this mental illness may be caused by dysfunction of your brain. The interaction of environment and genetics may play a part in this brain dysfunction.

There are several signs and symptoms that may be an indication of catatonic schizophrenia. Some of these are:

  • Peculiar movements like unusual or inappropriate postures, obsessively following a routine or repeating words
  • Extreme resistance to instructions
  • A complete inability to move
  • Imitating movements or speech
  • Moving in an excited or excessive way
  • Hallucinations (hearing or seeing things that do not exist)
  • Outbursts of anger
  • Uncoordinated, clumsy movements
  • Delusions (beliefs that are not based on reality)
  • Neglecting personal hygiene
  • Social isolation
  • Emotions that are not appropriate for the situation
  • A lack of emotions
  • Having trouble functioning at work or school
  • Speech that is incoherent.

You or a loved one may have been diagnosed with catatonic schizophrenia. This mental illness and/or complications resulting from it may be the reason why you are disabled and needing financial assistance.

You or your loved one may have decided to apply for financial help from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by catatonic schizophrenia and/or complications resulting from this mental illness. You or your loved one may have done this already and been denied?

If you or your loved one intends to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration, always remember this. People who have a disability lawyer like the one you can find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.