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Factor V Leiden Thrombophilia and Receiving Disability

Factor V Leiden thrombophilia is an inherited genetic blood clotting disease. Factor V Leiden thrombophilia means that you will have an increased tendency to develop abnormal blood clots (thrombophilia). If abnormal blood clots do occur, they will form mainly in your veins. In many instances, if you have factor V Leiden thrombophilia, you will never have abnormal blood clots take place. However, in other cases, you may see abnormal blood clots form that may bring about long-term, chronic health problems or become life-threatening. Are you one of those who is having chronic health problems because of factor V Leiden thrombophilia? If this is true, you may be able to get social security disability benefits like SSDI or SSI. The only way to know for sure is by contacting one of the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com. The social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com will explore the options that are available to you for receiving disability benefits. Factor V Leiden thrombophilia gets its name from the city of Leiden in the Netherlands. The disease was first identified in Leiden by Professor R. Bertina et al in 1994. It is unfortunate that factor V Leiden thrombophilia is a common inherited genetic disease. Somewhere around 5% of all Caucasians in North America are afflicted with this disease. Factor V Leiden thrombophilia is not as prevalent in Asians, Hispanics and Blacks. As stated above, factor V Leiden thrombophilia is an inherited genetic disease. This disorder is the result of inheriting a mutated (defective) copy of the factor V gene. You will only have a slightly higher tendency to form abnormal blood clots if you inherit one copy of the defective gene (heterozygous) from one of your parents. Your tendency to develop abnormal blood cots will be significantly higher if you inherit a faulty gene (homozygous) from each of your parents. There are other risk factors that may increase your likelihood of having factor V Leiden thrombophilia, besides inheriting the defective factor V gene. The primary ones are being Caucasian and of European descent. It may be that you will never experience any signs or symptoms at all with factor V Leiden thrombophilia. However, if signs and symptoms do occur, they will probably be determined by whether your blood clot moves, where the blood clot travels in your body and where your blood clot forms. Some of the signs and symptoms of a blood clot that develops close to the surface of your skin include: Some of the signs and symptoms of a blood clot that forms in a deep vein are: Some of the signs and symptoms of a blood clot that moves to your lungs include:  
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