Category Archives: Connective Tissue Diseases

Can I Get Social Security Disability for Dermatosclerosis

Can I get Social Security Disability for dermatosclerosis? You are probably asking this question because you have this disease, and it and/or complications that have resulted from the disease or other debilitating conditions that you have along with it are the reason why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

Continue reading

Herniation Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Herniation syndrome is a disorder that is characterized by the connective tissue of your brain, cerebrospinal fluid and blood vessels becoming displaced outside of the compartments in your head where they are normally located. This comes about as the result of an increase in intracranial pressure. Intracranial pressure is the pressure inside of your skull. Continue reading

Lobstein Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Lobstein syndrome is a skeletal disease that is marked by having extremely fragile bones that fracture (break) easily. These broken bones often occur under loads that would not cause normal bones to fracture.

Lobstein syndrome is a connective tissue disease. Lobstein syndrome takes place as a result of malfunction in your body’s production of the protein collagen. In the case of lobstein syndrome, the quality of the collagen that is produced by your body is too poor, or the amount is too little. Continue reading

Olecranon Bursitis and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Olecranon bursitis is a connective tissue disease that develops in your olecranon bursa that is located in your elbow. Olecranon bursitis is evidenced by inflammation, swelling and pain in your olecranon bursa.

Olecranon bursitis is referred to in other ways. It is also known as elbow bursitis, Popeye bursitis, baker’s elbow or student’s elbow.

The small fluid-filled pads that act as cushions among your bones and the tendons and muscles that are situated near your joints are known as bursae. This lubricating fluid in your bursae serve to help reduce friction, rubbing and irritation. There are around 160 bursae in your body.

Bursitis is a painful ailment that involves your bursae. Bursitis is characterized by inflammation of your bursae.

Bursitis can be a short-term (acute) ailment. Bursitis can also be a chronic (long-term, ongoing) ailment.

The areas of your body that are affected most often by bursitis are your hips, shoulders and elbows. In addition, bursitis may also occur at the base of your big toe, your heel or your knee. Your joints where repetitive motion is a prominent part of your daily routine is where bursitis usually takes place.

Bursitis is an ailment that is a frequent problem in the United States. However, it is not easy to know how often bursitis takes place. This is because bursitis is often mild and does not have to be treated.

Bursitis develops far more often in adults than it does in children. It occurs most frequently in adults who are over the age of 40.

3 things that can lead to Olecranon Bursitis

  1. The thing that is the number one cause of olecranon bursitis is inflammation. This inflammation usually results from pressure on your olecranon bursa or from inflammatory disorders.
  2. A second thing that causes olecranon bursitis is a sudden injury to your olecranon bursa. This may come from a blow to your elbow that produces fluid build up or bleeding.
  3. The third general cause of olecranon bursitis is infection. This infection may result from:
  •  Ÿ A blood-borne infection, which is rare
  • Ÿ  An injury at the sight of your olecranon bursa
  • Ÿ  An infection in your tissue that is near the olecranon bursa or that spreads to this bursa.

Risk Factors to develop Olecranon Bursitis

There are some risk factors that may increase your likelihood of developing olecranon bursitis. Some of these are:

  •  Undergoing hemodialysis
  • Ÿ  Taking anticoagulants
  • Ÿ  Alcoholism
  • Ÿ  Having diabetes mellitus
  • Ÿ  Participating in sports like golf, tennis or baseball
  • Ÿ  Being at an elderly age
  • Ÿ  Doing heavy lifting
  • Ÿ  Having gout
  • Ÿ  Having rheumatoid arthritis.

Signs and symptoms of olecranon bursitis

There are different signs and symptoms that you may experience with olecranon bursitis. Some of these include:

  •  Redness in your elbow joint
  • Ÿ  Redness, red streaking, fever, warmth and swollen lymph nodes in your armpit resulting from infection
  • Ÿ  Tenderness in your elbow
  • Ÿ  Swelling that is directly over the bony prominence of the tip of your elbow
  • Ÿ  Joint stiffness in your elbow
  • Ÿ  Pain around the back of your elbow that gets worse after periods of activity
  • Ÿ  Warmth over your olecranon bursa
  • Ÿ  Slightly limited motion of your elbow

Has olecranon bursitis and/or complications that have been caused by it or other conditions that you have along with this ailment led to your disability and being unable to work? As a result of your disability, do you need financial aid?

Have you considered filing for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Have you already filed and been denied by the Social Security Administration?

If you intend to reapply or appeal your denial, you really need to have the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com on your side. The disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com can get you the disability benefits that you have coming to you.

 

Costochondral Junction Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Arthritis is a medical disorder or disease. Its literal meaning is joint inflammation. Arthritis is inflammation of one or more of your joints that is usually marked by stiffness, swelling, pain, changes in structure and restriction of motion.  The form of this disorder we talk about here is Costochondral junction syndrome.

Arthritis is far greater than one single ailment. Arthritis is a complex disorder that is used to refer to over 100 separate ailments that may begin at any age of your life. However, the two most common types of arthritis in the United States are rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

Costochondral junction syndrome is one of the many forms of arthritis. Many times, costochondritis is used interchangeably with costochondral junction syndrome. However, while the two ailments are similar to one another,they are really two separate disorders.

What is Costochondral junction syndrome?

Costochondritis is inflammation of your cartilage that connects your sternum (breastbone) to a rib. Costochondritis is evidenced by sharp pain that is a localized type of chest pain. If you push on the cartilage at the front of your ribcage, you will probably reproduce the pain that comes from costochondritis.

On the other hand, costochondral junction syndrome is inflammation of the costochondral cartilages that are found in the upper front part of your chest. The difference between these two ailments is that there is localized swelling in the case of costochondral junction syndrome, while there is no swelling with costochondritis.

Costochondral junction syndrome is referred to in other ways. It is also known as chondropathia tuberosa, Tietze syndrome and costosternal chondrodynia.

Costochondral junction syndrome takes place most of the time in older children and younger adults. The ailment also occurs much more frequently in women than it does in men.

Costochondral junction syndrome may occur by itself and not be connected or associated with any other disease or disorder. On the other hand, costochondral junction syndrome may also result from other more serious disorders. These include things, such as:

  • Ÿ  Psoriatic arthritis
  • Ÿ  Ankylosing spondylitis
  • Ÿ  Crohn’s disease
  • Ÿ  Ulcerative colitis.

Causes and Signs of Costochondral junction syndrome

The specific cause of costochondral junction syndrome is not known at the present time. This ailment may develop as a result of a physical strain or a minor injury, such as coughing, impacts to your chest or vomiting. Costochondral junction syndrome may also take place because of an injury in your breast or chest or as a result of overexertion. Psychological stress may also cause this ailment to be made even worse.

As has already been stated, swelling is the primary sign or symptom of costochondral junction syndrome. It is the thing that distinguishes it from costochondritis. The beginning of your swelling and pain with costochondral junction syndrome may be either gradual or sudden. The pain may spread (radiate) to your arms and/or shoulders.

There are several other possible signs and symptoms that you may experience with costochondral junction syndrome. Some of these are:

  • Ÿ  Heat and redness
  • Ÿ  Tenderness and pain
  • Ÿ  Pain when you have to cough
  • Ÿ  Pain when you roll over in bed
  • Ÿ  Pain when you take a deep breath
  • Ÿ  Difficulty breathing
  • Ÿ  Difficulty with sleeping.

Chronic Compartment Syndrome and Disability

Chronic compartment syndrome is an uncommon, exercise-induced neuromuscular condition that is marked by swelling, pain and potential disability in the muscles of your legs or arms that are affected by the disorder. Chronic compartment syndrome is also characterized by your pain going away when you are resting.

Chronic compartment syndrome is known by other names. It is also referred to as chronic exertional compartment syndrome and exercise-induced compartment syndrome.

Chronic compartment syndrome usually takes place in experienced athletes who participate in sports that involve repetitive movements, such as biking, power walking, swimming or running. However, this condition is something that can occur in anyone.

Your legs and arms contain many compartments or groupings of nerves, blood vessels and muscles. A thick layer of connective tissue that is referred to as fascia encases each one of these compartments. Fascia supports these compartments. It is also what holds the tissues in place in each of these compartments. Fascia does not have the ability to stretch.

The pressure of your tissue that is inside of a compartment rises to an excessively high level when you are afflicted with chronic compartment syndrome. The problem is that the tissues, which are inside of that compartment are not able to expand adequately along with this increased pressure. This leads to your nerves and blood vessels becoming compressed and blood flow decreasing. This causes an inadequate amount of oxygen-rich blood (ischemia). This, in turn, results in damage to your muscles and nerves. This is a description of what chronic compartment syndrome is and does.

The reason why exercise causes this increased pressure in some people but not in others has not yet been determined. There are some theories that have been put forth as to why this may take place. Some of these are:

  • Ÿ  Having high pressure in your veins
  • Ÿ  How you move (biomechanics)
  • Ÿ  Having inelastic or thick fascia
  • Ÿ  Having increased muscle size.

Researchers believe that these things may have a part in leading to chronic compartment syndrome.

The hallmark sign or symptom of chronic compartment syndrome is pain that starts and gets increasingly worse whenever you engage in any form of exercise activity. This pain then begins to subside and go away when you finish the exercise activity and rest.

Symptoms of Chronic Compartment Syndrome

There are other signs and symptoms that are produced by chronic compartment syndrome. Some of these include:

  • Ÿ  Tightness in your limb that is affected
  • Ÿ  On occasions, there can be bulging or swelling that results from a muscle hernia
  • Ÿ  In cases that are severe, you may experience foot drop if the nerves of your leg are also affected
  • Ÿ  Tingling or numbness in you limb that is affected
  • Ÿ  Cramping, aching or burning pain in your affected limb while you are exercising.

Chronic compartment syndrome takes place most of the time in your lower legs. Usually, this condition will affect both of your legs and not just one of them. However, chronic compartment syndrome may also involve and affect your hand, forearms, upper arms and thighs.

Costosternal Chondrodynia Ailment of Arthritis and Disability

Arthritis is a medical disorder that literally means joint inflammation. Arthritis is inflammation of one or more of your joints that is characterized and usually accompanied by stiffness, swelling, pain, restriction of motion and changes in structure.

Arthritis is much larger than one single disorder. Arthritis is a complex disease that includes over 100 separate ailments that may originate at any age of your life. However, the two forms of arthritis that take place most often are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Costosternal chondrodynia is a kind of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is considered to be a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disorder that results in your immune system attacking your joints.

Costosternal chondrodynia is inflammation of the cartilage that joins a rib to your breastbone (sternum). Costosternal chondrodynia is evidenced by sharp pain that is a localized type of chest pain. By pushing on the cartilage at the front of your ribcage, you can usually reproduce the pain that is caused by costosternal chondrodynia.

Costosternal chondrodynia is referred to by other names. It as also called costosternal syndrome, chest wall pain or costochondritis.

Costosternal chondrodynia and Tietze syndrome are often used interchangeably. Even though they are similar, they are two separate disorders. The difference between these two disorders is that there is localized swelling with Tietze syndrome, while there is no swelling with costosternal chondrodynia.

One of the common causes of chest pain in adolescents and children is costosternal chondrodynia. This disorder accounts for somewhere around 10 to 30% of chest pain in children.

In instances where costosternal chondrodynia affects adults, women are afflicted with this disorder much more often than men are. In fact, women represent around 70% of the cases of costosternal chondrodynia.

Costosternal chondrodynia may develop as an independent disorder. What this means is that it has occurred without being associated with or coming as a consequence of some other type of condition or disorder. When this is the case, costosternal chondrodynia usually results in little harm and is resolved in a few days.

However, costosternal chondrodynia may also be a sign or symptom of a larger, more serious disease. Some of these disorders are things like Crohn’s disease, fibromyalgia, ulcerative colitis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis or psoriatic arthritis.

In most instances, what leads to the occurrence of costosternal chondrodynia is not known. However, in some cases, costosternal chondrodynia does have a cause that can be determined. Some of these causes are:

  1. Ÿ  Pain coming from other parts of your body
  2. Ÿ  An injury, such as a blow to you chest
  3. Ÿ  Being more vulnerable to infection after you have had surgery
  4. Ÿ  Infection that takes place in your costosternal joint.

Sharp Pain in Ribs and Costosternal Chondrodynia

The hallmark sign or symptom of costosternal chondrodynia is a sharp pain and tenderness where your ribs and your breastbone come together. This pain may also be a gnawing, dull kind of pain. Other signs and symptoms that you may experience include:

  •   Having a difficult time breathing
  • Ÿ  Pain when you take a deep breath
  • Ÿ  Pain when you have to cough.
Enhanced by Zemanta

Learn About Oromandibular Dystonia and Getting Disability

Dystonia is a neurological movement ailment that is evidenced by sustained muscle contractions. These muscle contractions may lead to twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures.

There are different forms of dystonia. Focal dystonia is one of the kinds of dystonia.

Focal dystonia is a type of dystonia that involves a localized part of your body. In most cases, focal dystonia affects your vocal cords, neck, mouth and/or jaw and eyes or your hand and/or arm.

The movements or muscle contractions that result from focal dystonia are involuntary. This means that you have no control over them. The muscle contractions or movements caused by focal dystonia may also cause significant pain.

In most instances, focal dystonia takes place in adults. However, focal dystonia may also develop in children and adolescents.

Focal dystonia usually occurs as a primary ailment. What this means is that it does not develop as a result of or secondary to another disease or condition. However, in some instances, focal dystonia may stem from or be secondary to a larger neurological or medical disorder.

Just as there are several kinds of dystonia, there are also several forms of focal dystonia. The various types of focal dystonia are determined by the area of your body that is affected by the ailment.

Oromandibular dystonia is one of the forms of focal dystonia. Oromandibular dystonia is also known as cranial dystonia.

Oromandibular dystonia is a type of focal dystonia that involves any muscle that is located above your neck. Oromandibular dystonia may affect your jaw, tongue, eyes or mouth.

The disorder is evidenced by problems with opening and closing your mouth. Oromandibular dystonia also may cause difficulty with your speech and chewing.

Oromandibular dystonia usually starts in adults who are between the ages of 40 and 70. Oromandibular dystonia also appears to be more common in women than it is in men.

Oromandibular dystonia is caused by a dysfunction of the basal ganglia of your brain. It may be primary, which means that it develops independently of any other disorder or disease. Or, oromandibular dystonia may be secondary. What this means is that it comes from secondary causes, such as drug exposure or certain diseases like Wilson’s disease.

Signs and Symptoms That You Might Have Oromandibular Dystonia

There are several different signs and symptoms that you may have, which may be an indication of oromandibular dystonia. The signs and symptoms produced by this ailment may range anywhere from being really mild to severe. Possible signs and symptoms include:

 

Ÿ  Your jaw being pulled open or shut

Ÿ  Difficulty when you eat

Ÿ  Speech that is breathy

Ÿ  Uncontrollable blinking

Ÿ  Problems with swallowing

Ÿ  Your tongue being pulled up, back or down

Ÿ  Difficulty talking

Ÿ  Bruxism (grinding or clenching of your teeth)

Ÿ  Pursing and tightening of your lips

Ÿ  Jaw pain.

 

In some cases, these signs and symptoms may be aggravated by certain activities like chewing, biting or speaking. They may be temporarily relieved by placing a toothpick in your mouth, applying pressure beneath your chin, talking, lightly touching your chin or lips or chewing gum.

There are several different signs and symptoms that you may have, which may be an indication of oromandibular dystonia. The signs and symptoms produced by this ailment may range anywhere from being really mild to severe. Possible signs and symptoms include:

  1. Ÿ  Your jaw being pulled open or shut
  2. Ÿ  Difficulty when you eat
  3. Ÿ  Speech that is breathy
  4. Ÿ  Uncontrollable blinking
  5. Ÿ  Problems with swallowing
  6. Ÿ  Your tongue being pulled up, back or down
  7. Ÿ  Difficulty talking
  8. Ÿ  Bruxism (grinding or clenching of your teeth)
  9. Ÿ  Pursing and tightening of your lips
  10. Ÿ  Jaw pain.

In some cases, these signs and symptoms may be aggravated by certain activities like chewing, biting or speaking. They may be temporarily relieved by placing a toothpick in your mouth, applying pressure beneath your chin, talking, lightly touching your chin or lips or chewing gum.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Disability Benefits for Radial Styloid Tenosynovitis in Your Thumb

You may not have given much thought to just how important your thumb is. The truth is that your thumb is truly an amazing and significant part of your body.

Your human thumb is referred to as an opposable thumb. This is because your thumb can move and touch your other fingers. This is the characteristic of your thumb that gives you the ability to grasp things.

Radial styloid tenosynovitis is an entrapment tendonitis of your tendons that are located in the first dorsal compartment at your wrist. Radial styloid tenosynovitis is a condition that involves the tenosynovitis (tendon sheaths) that go over your wrist joint.

Radial styloid tenosynovitis is evidenced by a painful inflammation of the tendons in your thumb that stretch to your wrist. These swollen tendons and the coverings that are over them rub against the narrow tunnel that they travel through. This leads to pain at the base of your thumb. This pain may radiate into your lower arm or shoulder.

Radial styloid tenosynovitis was discovered by the Swiss surgeon Fritz de Quervain. He published 5 case reports of people who had this condition in 1895.

Radial styloid tenosynovitis is known by other names. It is also called washerwoman’s sprain, mommy thumb and mother’s wrist, de Quervain disease, De Quervain’s tenosynovitis and de Quervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis.

Anyone of any age may develop radial styloid tenosynovitis. However, women are 8 to 10 times more likely to acquire this condition than men are.

Radial styloid tenosynovitis takes place when the tendons that move your thumb away from your index finger become swollen and painful. There are different things that can cause this to occur. Some of these are:

  1. ŸSome kind of direct injury or trauma that occurs to your wrist or tendon, due to the fact that scar tissue can hinder the movement of your tendons
  2. ŸThe overuse of your wrist that comes from performing a repetitive gripping or twisting motion on a daily basis for an extended period of time
  3. ŸHaving an inflammatory arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

The main risk factor that may increase your likelihood of having radial styloid tenosynovitis is engaging in an occupation or hobby that involves repetitive wrist and hand motions. Other risk factors include:

  • Ÿ  Being between the ages of 30 and 50
  • Ÿ  Being female.

There are several different signs and symptoms that may be an indication of radial styloid tenosynovitis. Some of the possible signs and symptoms are:

  • Ÿ  A fluid-filled cyst that develops near the base of your thumb
  • Ÿ  A squeaking sound that occurs as your tendons attempt to move back and forth through your inflamed sheaths
  • Ÿ  Having difficulty tr
    Tenosynovitis

    Tenosynovitis (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    ying to move your thumb and wrist when you try to do things that involve grasping or pinching

  • Ÿ  Swelling that is located close to the base of your thumb
  • Ÿ  Pain that occurs close to the base of your thumb that may radiate into your forearm or shoulder
  • Ÿ  A “sticking“ or “stop-and-go” feeling in your thumb when you try to move it.