Category Archives: Endocrine

Getting Social Security Disability for Diabetic Nephropathy

Can I get Social Security Disability for diabetic nephropathy? This is a question you may be asking if you are afflicted with this disease, and it and/or complications resulting from it or other debilitating conditions along with it are why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Severe diabetes how will my benefits be calculated?

Recently on our disability forum a user asked, “I have severe diabetes. I am currently receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) for my condition, but I have recently had both of my legs amputated. I was wondering how my SSDI is calculated and whether my SSDI benefits will increase since my condition has become more severe?”

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Chronic Illness and disability benefits

According to the United States National Center for Health Statistics, a chronic illness is any type of disability or condition which lasts for three or more months, does not disappear, and cannot be prevented by medication. Unfortunately, up to 85% of our current population over the age of 65 years has one or more types of chronic conditions.

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Juvenile Diabetes, SSI and Children

If you have a child with juvenile diabetes it may be possible for them to qualify for SSI benefits, but they will have to meet very specific medical requirements outlined by the Social Security Administration. Additionally, your family must also meet the financial limitations outlined by the Supplemental Security Income or SSI program.

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Hypocortisolism and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Hypocortisolism is a condition that affects your adrenal glands. Your adrenal glands are located just above your kidneys. The outside layer of these glands makes hormones that help your body regulate your salt and water balance and your blood pressure. These hormones also help your body to cope with stress.

Hypocortisolism is evidenced by your adrenal glands not producing enough of these hormones. Hypocortisolism is also marked by a reduction in your ability to deal with stress. Continue reading

Prostate Gland Enlargement and Receiving Social Security Disability

For a man, your prostate is the small walnut-shaped gland in your male reproductive system that has the job of making seminal fluid. Seminal fluid is the fluid that carries and nourishes sperm.  Learn about prostate gland enlargement and how you can possibly receive disability benefits if you have it. Continue reading

Burning Tongue Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Burning tongue syndrome is a disorder that is evidenced by pain in your mouth, tongue and/or lips. You may feel just as if your mouth has been scalded or burned with some type of hot liquid. Burning tongue syndrome may also be marked by a metallic or bitter taste in your mouth or a sore or dry mouth.

Burning tongue syndrome is referred to in other ways. It is also called stomatodynia, glossodynia, burning mouth syndrome, scalded mouth syndrome and burning lips syndrome.

Men and women are both affected by burning tongue syndrome, but it develops most often in women who are middle-aged and older. It occurs quite often in women during and after menopause. Burning tongue syndrome affects somewhere around 5% of the population of the United States.

Possible conditions indicating Burning Tongue Syndrome

Burning tongue syndrome may be associated with other underlying medical conditions. This disorder may also be an indication of other medical ailments. Some of these are:

  • Ÿ  As a complication of therapy for cancer
  • Ÿ  Deficiencies of things like vitamin B-12, iron, thiamin, pyridoxine, niacin, folate, or riboflavin
  • Ÿ  Irritation that comes as a result of dentures
  • Ÿ  Having had a recent illness, dental procedure or course of medication
  • Ÿ  The beginning of menopausal-hormonal changes
  • Ÿ  An oral yeast infection
  • Ÿ  Diabetes
  • Ÿ  Anemia

If the cause of your burning tongue syndrome cannot be found, the disorder is considered to be primary or idiopathic. What this means is that burning tongue syndrome has occurred independently of any other condition. Researchers think that idiopathic burning tongue syndrome may be associated with sensory and taste nerves of your central or peripheral nervous system.

When burning tongue syndrome is due to an underlying condition, it is known as secondary burning tongue syndrome. Underlying conditions that may lead to burning tongue syndrome include:

  •  Ÿ  Nutritional deficiencies
  • Ÿ  Nerve damage
  • Ÿ  Dry mouth (xerostomia)
  • Ÿ  Endocrine disorders, such as hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) and diabetes
  • Ÿ  Psychological factors like anxiety, depression or excessive health worries
  • Ÿ  Hormonal imbalances
  • Ÿ  Certain medications, such as high blood pressure medications like ACE inhibitors
  • Ÿ  Excessive irritation of your mouth
  • Ÿ  Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Ÿ  Allergies or reactions to dyes, fragrances, food additives or food flavorings
  • Ÿ  Wearing dentures
  • Ÿ  Oral habits, such as tongue thrusting or teeth grinding.

 

Risks and Signs that you may have Burning Tongue Syndrome

There are some risk factors that may increase your likelihood of developing burning tongue syndrome. Some of these are being a woman over the age of 50, traumatic events in life, previous dental procedures, an upper respiratory tract infection, stress, allergic reactions to food and having a high density of the small tongue bumps called papillae.

There are several different signs and symptom that may be caused by burning tongue syndrome. Some of these include:

  1. Ÿ  Changes in your eating habits
  2. Ÿ  Pain that may be spontaneous and gradual but that gets more severe as the day goes on
  3. Ÿ  A burning sensation in your tongue, mouth, lips and throat
  4. Ÿ  Loss of taste
  5. Ÿ  Alterations of your taste
  6. Ÿ  An increase in thirst
  7. Ÿ  Restlessness that may lead to things like anxiety, depression, irritability and mood changes
  8. Ÿ  A scalded feeling in your mouth
  9. Ÿ  Changes in the medications that you are taking
  10. Ÿ  Interference with your sleeping
  11. Ÿ  Dry mouth
  12. Ÿ  A metallic or bitter taste in your mouth

You may be disabled and unable to work because of complications that have been caused by burning tongue syndrome and/or other conditions that you also have along with this disorder. If so, do you need financial help?

Did you apply for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Were you denied?

If you plan on reapplying or appealing your denial, your really should have the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com on your side. The disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com can get you the disability benefits that you have coming to you.

Scalded Mouth Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Scalded mouth syndrome is an ailment that is marked by pain in your lips, mouth and/or tongue. You may feel as though your mouth has been burned or scalded with some kind of hot liquid. Scalded mouth syndrome may also be characterized by a bitter or metallic taste in your mouth or a dry or sore mouth.

Scalded mouth syndrome is known by other names. It is also referred to as glossodynia, stomatodynia, burning mouth syndrome, burning lips syndrome and burning tongue syndrome.

Although anyone of any age can get scalded mouth syndrome, it occurs most of the time in women who are middle-aged and older. It takes place many times in women during and after menopause. About 5% of the population of the United States has scalded mouth syndrome.

Medical problems associated with Scalded Mouth Syndrome

Scalded mouth syndrome may be an indication of other medical problems. It may also be associated with other underlying medical difficulties. Some of these include:

  • Ÿ  Irritation that comes from dentures
  • Ÿ  An oral yeast infection
  • Ÿ  Anemia
  • Ÿ  As a complication of therapy for cancer
  • Ÿ  Diabetes
  • Ÿ  The beginning of menopausal-hormonal changes
  • Ÿ  Deficiencies of things like niacin, vitamin B-12, riboflavin, iron, thiamin, pyridoxine or folate
  • Ÿ  Having had a recent course of medication, illness or dental procedure.

If the reason for your scalded mouth syndrome is not known, the ailment is referred to as being idiopathic or primary. This means that scalded mouth syndrome has developed independently of any other medical problem. Scientists believe that scalded mouth syndrome may be connected with sensory and taste nerves of your peripheral or central nervous system.

Secondary conditions of Scalded Mouth Syndrome

When scalded mouth syndrome is caused by another medical condition, it is called secondary scalded mouth syndrome. Underlying conditions that may result in scalded mouth syndrome are:

  • Ÿ  Oral habits, such as teeth grinding or tongue thrusting
  • Ÿ  Hormonal imbalances
  • Ÿ  Endocrine conditions like diabetes or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid)
  • Ÿ  Nutritional deficiencies
  • Ÿ  Allergies or reactions to fragrances, food flavorings, dyes or food additives
  • Ÿ  Nerve damage
  • Ÿ  Wearing dentures
  • Ÿ  Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Ÿ  Dry mouth (xerostomia)
  • Ÿ  Psychological factors like anxiety, depression or excessive health worries
  • Ÿ  Excessive mouth irritation
  • Ÿ  Certain medications, such as high blood pressure medications like ACE inhibitors.

Risk factors and signs of scalded mouth syndrome

There are some risk factors that may increase your risk of getting scalded mouth syndrome. Some of these include stress, having a high density of the small tongue bumps known as papillae, being a woman over the age of 50, an upper respiratory tract infection, allergic reactions to food, traumatic events in life and previous dental procedures.

There are several different signs and symptoms that you may experience with scalded mouth syndrome. Some of these are:

  1. Ÿ  Restlessness that may result in things like irritability, mood changes, anxiety and depression
  2. Ÿ  An increase in thirst
  3. Ÿ  Interference with your sleep
  4. Ÿ  Changes in your eating habits
  5. Ÿ  A bitter or metallic taste in your mouth
  6. Ÿ  Pain that may be spontaneous and gradual but that becomes more severe as the day progresses
  7. Ÿ  Dry mouth
  8. Ÿ  A burning sensation in your tongue, mouth, lips and throat
  9. Ÿ  Changes in the medications that you are taking
  10. Ÿ  A scalded feeling in your mouth
  11. Ÿ  Alterations of your taste
  12. Ÿ  Loss of taste.

You may have become incapacitated and not be able to work due to complications that have developed from scalded mouth syndrome and/or other disorders that you have besides this ailment. If this is the case, are you looking for financial aid?

Have you filed for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Have you been turned down?

Are you thinking about reapplying or appealing your denial? If you do, you really need the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com in your corner. The disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com can help you receive the disability benefits that you deserve.