Category Archives: Genitourinary

Can I Get Social Security Disability for Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

Can I get Social Security Disability for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis? If this is something you want to know, it is probably because you have this disease, and it and/or complications that have resulted from the disease are why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Getting Social Security Disability for Endometriosis

Can I get Social Security Disability for endometriosis? Although endometriosis is not usually a disease that would qualify you to get Social Security Disability, it may be that the disease or complications resulting from it and/or other debilitating conditions in addition to it have caused you to be disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Getting Social Security Disability for Diabetic Nephropathy

Can I get Social Security Disability for diabetic nephropathy? This is a question you may be asking if you are afflicted with this disease, and it and/or complications resulting from it or other debilitating conditions along with it are why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Clostridium Difficile and Getting Social Security Disability

Would I be able to get Social Security Disability with clostridium difficile? You are probably asking this question because you have an infection that was caused by this bacteria, and it and/or complications that have resulted from it or other debilitating conditions that you have along with it are the reason why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Getting Social Security Disability for Chronic Atrophic Pyelonephritis

Can I get Social Security Disability for chronic atrophic pyelonephritis? You may be asking this question because this condition and/or complications that have resulted from it or other ailments that you have in conjunction with it are the reason why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Acid Alpha-Glucosidase Deficiency and Receiving Social Security Disability

Acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic ailment. Acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency is the most severe type of glycogen storage disease. Thankfully, it is much rarer than von Gierke’s disease. Von Gierke’s disease is the most common kind of glycogen storage disease.

Acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency is thought to occur in about 1 in 40,000 to 300,000 births in the United States. Children have a 1 in 4 chance of inheriting this ailment when both parents carry the defective (faulty) gene. This is what is known as an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Continue reading

Synpharyngitic Glomerulonephritis and Receiving Social Security Disability

Your kidneys are located in your abdomen toward the back. Normally, one is on each side of your spine.  Your kidneys receive their blood supply by means of the renal arteries directly from your aorta. They carry blood back to your heart through the renal veins to the vena cava. (The term “renal” is taken from the Latin name for kidney.)  This post is about Synpharyngitic glomerulonephritis, a kidney ailment that hinders your kidneys’ ability to remove excess waste and fluids. Continue reading

Congenital Platelet Function Defects and Receiving Social Security Disability

Congenital platelet function defects is a genetic (inherited) bleeding disorder. It is a bleeding disorder that involves problems with your platelets.  Platelets are tiny cells that circulate in your blood. Their main job is to have a part in the process of the clotting of your blood. Continue reading

Mediterranean Anemia and Social Security Disability

Mediterranean anemia is a genetic (hereditary) blood disease. What this means is that Mediterranean anemia is a disorder that you get because you inherit a mutated (defective) gene or genes from your parents; or, you are missing a gene or genes that you should have gotten.

Mediterranean anemia is characterized by your body making less healthy red blood cells and less hemoglobin than what your body needs. Hemoglobin is an iron-rich protein that is located in your red blood cells. Hemoglobin is the substance that causes your red blood cells to be able to carry oxygen to all of the parts of your body.

When your hemoglobin is not defective it is known as hemoglobin A. Normal hemoglobin is composed of four protein chains. Two of these chains are called alpha globin, and two of the chains are referred to as beta globin.

There are two main forms of Mediterranean anemia. They are alpha and beta Mediterranean anemia. Their names come from the defects that take place in these four protein chains.

Understanding the Necessary Genes for Protein Chains

There are four genes that you need to have in order for a sufficient number of alpha globin protein chains to be made. Alpha Mediterranean anemia develops when one or two of the four genes that you have to have are missing. Moderate to severe Mediterranean anemia occurs when more than two of the genes are not there.

There are two genes that you have to have in order to have a sufficient number of beta protein chains. You get one of these genes from each one of your parents. Beta Mediterranean anemia takes place when one or both of these genes are defective or missing.

Mediterranean anemia is known by other names. It is also referred to as thalassemia and Cooley’s anemia.

Both men and women develop Mediterranean anemia. The disease develops most of the time in people who are of Greek, Italian, Middle Eastern, Asian and African descent.

Fortunately, Mediterranean anemia is a rare disease. This means that it affects less than 200,000 people in the United States.

As stated above, Mediterranean anemia is an inherited disease. The only way for you to get this disease is to inherit one or more defective hemoglobin genes from your parents.

Because of the nature of Mediterranean anemia, there are two main risk factors that may  increase your likelihood of having this disease. They are your family history and your ancestry.

Signs and Symptoms of Mediterranean Anemia

If you have a mild type of Mediterranean anemia, you may not have any signs or symptoms at all. When you do have signs and symptoms with this disease, they depend on the form and severity of Mediterranean anemia that you are afflicted with. Possible signs and symptoms that you may experience are:

  • Ÿ  Slow growth
  • Ÿ  Fatigue and/or weakness
  • Ÿ  Shortness of breath
  • Ÿ  A protruding abdomen
  • Ÿ  Jaundice (a yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes)
  • Ÿ  A pale appearance
  • Ÿ  Deformities in your facial bones
  • Ÿ  Irritability
  • Ÿ  Dark urine
  • Ÿ  Swelling of your liver and spleen.
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