Category Archives: Respiratory

Edema and Getting Social Security Disability

Can I get Social Security Disability for edema? If this is a question that you are asking, it is probably because you have edema, and edema is the primary sign or symptom of an underlying condition that is causing it. As a result, you have become disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Getting Social Security Disability for Dyspnea

Will I be able to get Social Security Disability for dyspnea? If you are asking this question, it is probably because you are suffering with dyspnea, and it is one of the primary symptoms of an underlying condition that is responsible for you being disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Cystic fibrosis can my son get SSI benefits?

Recently on our disability forum a user asked, “My child has been diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. We have very little money and I am afraid we will not be able to afford the necessary medical care to properly care for him. What are our options? Are there any federally funded programs that can help subsidize my son’s medical care?”

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Cystic Bronchiectasis and Getting Social Security Disability

Will I be able to get Social Security Disability with cystic bronchiectasis? If you are asking this question, it is probably because you have this disease, and it and/or complications that have resulted from the disease or other disabling disorders that you have along it are why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Chronic Respiratory issues and continuing disability review

Recently on our disability forum a user asked, “I received notification that the Social Security Administration is conducting a Continuing Disability Review (CDR) for my Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) case. I have severe chronic respiratory issues. I have difficulty breathing without an oxygen tank. There is no way I can return to work. I am scared. Will I lose my benefits?”

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ARDS and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

ARDS stands for acute respiratory disease syndrome. ARDS is breathing failure that takes place in critically ill people who are suffering from an underlying illness.

ARDS is not a specific disorder or disease. ARDS is a life-threatening condition that results from a severe fluid buildup in both of your lungs.

This fluid buildup does not allow your lungs to work like they should. Your lungs are not able to transfer oxygen from the air into your body and carbon dioxide out of your body into the air the way they ought to. Continue reading

Supraglottitis and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Your epiglottis is a thin lid-like flap of cartilage tissue that is joined to the root of your tongue. Your epiglottis is situated in front, behind your tongue and in front of the entrance to your larynx (voice box).

Your epiglottis is what allows air to pass through your voice box and into the remainder of your respiratory system while you are at rest. Your epiglottis covers the entrance to your voice box when you swallow. By virtue of this action, your epiglottis prevents liquids and food from going into your windpipe.

Food might get into your lungs and air might be able to enter your stomach if both your air passage and food passage were open as you swallow. One of the main purposes and tasks of your epiglottis is to prevent this from happening. The way in which your epiglottis accomplishes this is by working the way a lid does every time you swallow.

Supraglottitis is a disease that is marked by your epiglottis becoming swollen and inflamed. The flow of air into your lungs gets blocked when this disease takes place, and it becomes a potentially life-threatening occurrence. If you are suffering from supraglottitis, you may qualify to receive some kind of social security disability benefits like SSI or SSDI. It is always a wise move to contact one of the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com to explore the options that are available to you. The social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com are experienced in dealing with the Social Security Administration when it comes to disability benefits. Go to disabilitycasereview.com, right now.

Fortunately, supraglottitis is a rare disease in adults in the United States. However, there is some evidence which indicates that the incidence of the disease may be on the rise. It is estimated that there are somewhere around 10 to 40 cases of supraglottitis per million people in the United States.

Supraglottitis takes place in men more often than it does in women. This is by a ratio of about 6 to 4.

Supraglottitis may be brought about by either injury or infection. Injuries that may lead to this disease include:

  • Swallowing a chemical that burns your throat
  • Burns that occur as a result of drinking an extremely hot liquid
  • Smoking drugs, such as crack cocaine
  • Sustaining a direct blow of some kind to your throat
  • Swallowing a foreign object

Infections that may result in supraglottitis are:

  • Pneumococcus (streptococcus pneumoniae)
  • Candida albicans
  • Streptococcus A, B and C
  • Varicella zoster
  • Hib bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae type b)

The signs and symptoms that result from supraglottitis may occur slowly over a period of days in adults. However, the signs and symptoms of supraglottitis may also come on within a matter of a few hours. Some of the signs and symptoms of this disease include:

  • Having problems with speaking
  • Having a difficult time breathing
  • A heart rate that is fast
  • A severe sore throat
  • Breathing that becomes raspy and harsh
  • Fever
  • Your voice becoming muffled or hoarse
    Supraglottitis and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

    You may qualify for disability benefits if you have Supraglottitis.

     

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Acquired Bronchiectasis and Receiving Social Security Disability

Bronchiectasis is a disease that is characterized by damage that occurs to the walls of your large airways (bronchial tubes) of your lungs. Inflammation that is the result of infection or other causes destroys the smooth muscles that allow your bronchial tubes to be elastic. Inflammation also stops secretions from being cleared that are normally made by your lung tissue.

The walls of your airways start to become irregularly shaped. Secretions start to accumulate in your distorted airways instead of being gotten rid of. This leads to the formation of a breeding ground for the growth of bacteria. These bacteria then produce more secretions, additional irritation and inflammation and airway damage. This results in a vicious cycle of damage.

Bronchiectasis is a kind of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), along with emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Bronchiectasis may be present by itself, but usually more than one of the types of COPD are present in addition to this disease.

There are two types of bronchiectasis. If you are born with this disease, it is known as congenital bronchiectasis. If you acquire this disease later on in life, it is referred to as acquired bronchiectasis.

Acquired bronchiectasis usually develops as the result of another medical ailment.  Acquired bronchiectasis usually takes place in older children and adults. It is more common that the congenital form of this disease.

Acquired bronchiectasis develops because of recurrent inflammation or infection of your bronchial tubes. In many instances, acquired bronchiectasis begins in childhood as a complication of infection or inhaling a foreign object. Somewhere around 50% of all of the cases of acquired bronchiectasis in the United States are the result of cystic fibrosis.

There are some risk factors that may increase your likelihood of having acquired bronchiectasis. Some of these include:

Ÿ  Recurrent, severe lung infections, such as pneumonia, tuberculosis and fungal infections

Ÿ  Obstruction of your bronchial tubes that results from a foreign body

Ÿ  Abnormal lung defenses

Ÿ  Obstruction of your bronchial tubes that is brought about by a tumor.

The signs and symptoms that are brought about by acquired bronchiectasis often begin gradually. They may start months or even years after what led to the disease. Some of the signs and symptoms are:

Ÿ  A chronic cough that contains large quantities of foul-smelling sputum

Ÿ  Coughing up blood

Ÿ  Bad breath odor

Ÿ  Clubbing of your fingers

Ÿ  A bluish skin color

Ÿ  Wheezing (a high-pitched whistling sound that is made while you are breathing)

Ÿ  A cough that gets worse when you are lying down on one side

Ÿ  Weight loss that is not intentional

Ÿ  Shortness of breath that gets worse when you exercise

Ÿ  Chronic fatigue

Ÿ  Paleness of your appearance.

Your doctor will probably ask you to describe your signs and symptoms, do a physical exam and want to know your medical history in order to diagnose your acquired bronchiectasis. Your doctor will also likely want you to have some diagnostic tests and procedures to rule out other causes of your signs and symptoms, see how damaged your airways are and to identify the underlying cause of your acquired bronchiectasis. Some of these may include:

Ÿ  Chest X-ray

Ÿ  Lung function tests

Ÿ  Blood tests

Ÿ  Chest CT scan (computerized tomography).

Are you incapacitated and not able to work as a result of disability that has developed from acquired bronchiectasis and/or complications resulting from this disease.

If this is true, do you need financial assistance.

Have you applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Has the Social Security Administration denied your application?

If you plan on reapplying or appealing your denial, disabilitycasereview.com is the right place to be. The disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com knows how to work with the Social Security Administration.

Do not put this off. Call disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Histotoxic Anoxia and Receiving Social Security Disability

Anoxia is a condition that is characterized by an absence of oxygen supply to a tissue or an organ. This is in spite of there being an adequate amount of blood flow to that organ or tissue.

Hypoxia is a condition that is evidenced by a decrease in oxygen to an organ or a tissue. Again, as with anoxia, this takes place in spite of there being an adequate blood flow to that tissue or organ.

Anoxia and hypoxia are often used interchangeably. This is in spite of the fact that they refer to conditions that are similar but different. Hypoxia refers to a condition that involves a decrease in oxygen reaching a tissue or an organ, while anoxia refers to a condition in which there is no oxygen reaching an organ or a tissue.

There are five different forms of anoxia. They are stagnant anoxia, anemic anoxia, anoxic anoxia, affinity anoxia and histotoxic anoxia.

Histotoxic anoxia is anoxia that develops in spite of the fact that your body is receiving an adequate amount of oxygen. The problem is that your body is not able to use the oxygen because of physiological difficulties that are occurring at a cellular level.

Histotoxic anoxia is usually brought about by exposure to toxic substances. This can include things like acetone, toluene, formaldehyde and certain anesthetic agents.

Histotoxic anoxia may result from substance abuse. This can be things like the excessive drinking of alcohol or excessive use of narcotics.

In other instances, histotoxic anoxia can be caused by exposure in poorly controlled or insufficiently ventilated areas to poisonous gases or chemicals like cyanide poisoning, carbon monoxide poisoning or poison gas attack. In these instances, the ability of the hemoglobin in your blood to carry, bind and release oxygen are inhibited by these poisonous substances.

There are also several other things that can lead to histotoxic anoxia. These are things that may result in all of the various kinds of anoxia, in addition to histotoxic anoxia. Some of these include:

Ÿ  Cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat)

Ÿ  Electrical shock

Ÿ  Brain tumors

Ÿ  Respiratory disorders that interfere with your breathing

Ÿ  Compression of your trachea

Ÿ  Respiratory arrest

Ÿ  Suffocation

Ÿ  Extremely low blood pressure (hypotension)

Ÿ  Near Drowning

Ÿ  Choking

Ÿ  A heart attack (myocardial infarction).

There are several signs and symptoms that you may have, which may be an indication of histotoxic anoxia. Some of these include:

Ÿ  Numbness

Ÿ  Limp muscles

Ÿ  Headache

Ÿ  Tingling in your fingers or toes

Ÿ  A dizzy or lightheaded sensation

Ÿ  Cyanosis (your fingernails and lips looking blue)

Ÿ  Impairment in your judgment

Ÿ  Being drowsy

Ÿ  Impairment in your vision

Ÿ  A decrease in your reaction time

Ÿ  A feeling of euphoria

Ÿ  Confusion

Ÿ  Coma

Ÿ  Difficulty with your memory

Ÿ  Difficulty with movement

Ÿ  Loss of consciousness.

The diagnosis of histotoxic anoxia is usually made on the basis of you displaying the clinical signs and symptoms of this condition. If your doctor thinks it is needed, there are diagnostic tests and procedures that can be used to help confirm a diagnosis of histotoxic anoxia. The particular test that you would undergo is usually determined by the suspected cause of your histotoxic anoxia.

 

Has histotoxic anoxia and/or complications that have arisen from it or whatever the underlying cause of the condition is caused your disability? Is histotoxic anoxia keeping you from working.

As a result, do you need financial assistance. Have you applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Was your application denied by the Social Security Administration?

If you are wondering what to do now, your really ought to go to disabilitycasereview.com. The lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com knows what to do. The attorney at disabilitycasereview.com will be on your side. Do not hesitate. Call disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease (COAD) and Receiving Social Security Disability

Gross pathology of lung showing centrilobular ...

Image via Wikipedia

Chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD) is not a single disease, but rather it is a group of diseases that are marked by the pathological limitation of airflow in your airway that is not fully reversible. COAD is a large umbrella term that is used to refer to emphysema, chronic bronchitis and several other lung disorders.

Chronic obstructive airway disease is a lung disease in which your lungs are damaged. This makes it difficult for you to breathe. With COAD, your airways, which are the tubes that transport air in and out of your lungs, become partly obstructed. The result is that it becomes difficult for air to get in and out of your lungs.

You may wonder how large and common a problem chronic obstructive airway disease is in the United States. COAD is something that millions of Americans have to deal with. In fact, about 14 million people in the United States have chronic obstructive airway disease. COAD is the 4th leading cause of death in the United States.

Smoking is by far the leading cause of chronic obstructive airway disease. This means that smokers are the ones who are at the greatest risk of developing COAD.

However, there are other things that may contribute to the development of chronic obstructive airway disease. Occupational pollutants like cadmium, silica and asbestos have also been shown to be contributing factors in the occurrence of COAD.  Air pollution and genetics also play a role in causing chronic obstructive airway disease. Other possible factors that may lead to COAD include:

  • Increasing age
  • Allergy
  • General impaired lung function
  • Being a man
  • Repeated airway infection.

Chronic obstructive airway disease is something that usually develops slowly. In fact, it may be many years before you begin to notice the signs and symptoms of COAD. Possible signs and symptoms that you may experience with chronic obstructive airway disease are:

  • Dyspnea (feeling short of breath)
  • Wheezing
  • A persistent cough with sputum or blood
  • A decrease in exercise toleration
  • Cyanosis (bluish or purplish discoloration of your skin around your lips and nails).

You or a loved one may have chronic obstructive airway disease. COAD and/or complications that have resulted from it or other ailments that you have besides this disease may have led to the disability of you or your loved one and be the reason why you are not able to work.

If this is the case, you may need assistance. You may need financial help.

You or your loved one may have decided to apply for the financial assistance that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has been caused by chronic obstructive airway disease and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other ailments that you have besides this disease. You may have already tried this option, and your claim was turned down by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is intending to reapply or appeal the denial, you really ought to keep this important fact in mind that you may not know about. It is an established fact that people who are represented by a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who do not have a disability lawyer standing with them.

Please do not hesitate or wait until tomorrow. This is far too important to you or your loved one. Contact the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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