Category Archives: Special Senses and Speech

Can I Get Social Security Disability for Entropion

Can I get Social Security Disability for entropion? If this is something you want to know, it is most likely because you have this condition and complications resulting from it and/or other ailments that you have along with it have caused you to be disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

Continue reading

Meniere’s disease and severe vertigo can I get SSDI

Recently on our disability forum a user asked, “I have been diagnosed with Meniere’s disease. Many days my condition is so severe and my vertigo so debilitating that I am unable to walk, drive or go to work. My boss has been very accommodating, but it’s getting to the point where I am going to have to quit work. I was wondering if I might qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)?”

Continue reading

Can I Get Social Security Disability for Dysphonia

Can I get Social Security Disability for dysphonia? If this is something you want to know, it is probably because you have this disorder, and it and/or complications that have resulted from the disorder or other conditions that you have in addition to it have caused you to be disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

Continue reading

Dysgraphia and Social Security Disability

Will I qualify for Social Security Disability with dysgraphia? If you are asking this question, it is probably because you have this disorder, and it and/or complications resulting from dysgraphia or other conditions that you have along with it have caused you to be disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

Continue reading

Getting Social Security Disability for Dysarthria

Can I get Social Security Disability for dysarthria? If this is something you want to know, it is probably because you have this disorder, and it and/or complications resulting from the disorder or the underlying condition that caused it may be why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

Continue reading

Tinnitus and SSDI benefits

Tinnitus in an ear condition which includes hearing any noise which does not originate outside of the ear or head and is generally caused by hearing loss, damage to ear, circulatory issues, exposure to loud noises, abnormal bone growth, Meniere’s disease, tumor of the cranial nerve, spasms of the muscles within the middle ear, temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ), certain dysfunctions of the auditory tube that connects the middle ear with the back of the throat, or the presence of foreign objects within the ear canal.

Continue reading

Blepharospasm and SSDI disability Benefits

Blepharospasm is a condition of the eye which causes involuntary, abnormal blinking and spasms of the eyelids. Although the direct cause of Blepharospasm is not known, medical experts suggest the condition is caused by the abnormal function of the basal ganglion, the part of the brain which controls muscles. Recently on our disability forum a user asked, “I have severe blepharospasms and have difficulty performing work. Can I qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance for my condition?”

Continue reading

Stargardt macular degeneration and SSDI benefits

Stargardt macular degeneration is a genetic eye condition that can progressively lead to vision loss. It currently is the most common form of juvenile macular degeneration, with symptoms beginning in early childhood. Medical experts estimate that Stargardt macular degeneration may affect as many as one in ten thousand individuals. Other common names for Stargardt macular degeneration can include juvenile macular degeneration, macular dystrophy with flecks, type 1, Stargardt disease, and STGD.

Continue reading

Meniere’s disease and SSDI benefits

Meniere’s disease, named after the French physician Prosper Meniere, is caused by disturbances in the inner ear and can lead to periodic episodes of vertigo and a sickening feeling of spinning out of control. Meniere’s sufferers can also experience hearing loss, tinnitus, and ear pressure. The disease can affect one or both ears and is most common in older adults ages forty to fifty.

Continue reading

Photocoagulation Retina From Diabetes and Disability

Diabetes is a disease that affects millions and millions of people in the United States. Almost 21 million children and adults are affected by this disease in the United States. This represents 7% of the population of the world.

Out of this number, it is estimated that 14.6 million people have already been diagnosed with diabetes. The problem is there are another 6.2 million people (nearly one-third) who have not found out that they have this disease.

Diabetes is much larger than one disease. It is really a category of related diseases that are marked by your body being unable to regulate the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood.

Glucose in your blood is what enables you to have the energy to carry out your daily physical activities. The level of glucose in your blood is controlled by several hormones. Insulin is one of these hormones. People who have diabetes either cannot use insulin in the right way, or they cannot make enough insulin. In some cases, diabetes may involve both of these difficulties.

Photocoagulation – retina is a complication that may develop as a result of diabetes. Photocoagulation – retina may take place in anyone who has type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Photocoagulation – retina is evidenced by damage to your retina. Your retina is a light-sensitive layer that is located at the back of your eye. Your retina covers about 65% of the interior surface of your eye. Photosensitive cells that are referred to as rods and cones inside of your retina convert incident light energy into signals that your optic nerve takes to your brain.

Photocoagulation – retina is a problem that is growing larger for adults in the United States. It is estimated that more than 4 million adults who are the age of 40 and older are affected by this disease.

As stated earlier, photocoagulation – retina is a complication that develops from long-term diabetes. The longer that you live with diabetes and the more frequently your blood sugar (glucose) levels are not in the range where they should be, the more likely you are to get photocoagulation – retina. This is because the tiny blood vessels of your retina are damaged when your blood sugar levels are too high.

Photocoagulation – retina may take place in anyone with diabetes. However, there are some risk factors that may increase your risk of getting this disease. Some of these include:

  • Ÿ  Smoking
  • Ÿ  High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Ÿ  Pregnancy
  • Ÿ  Poor control of your blood sugar level
  • Ÿ  High cholesterol
  • Ÿ  Being Black or Hispanic.

Photocoagulation – retina does not usually cause any signs or symptoms until you have sustained severe damage to your eyes. Signs and symptoms that you may have are:

  • Ÿ  Impairment in your color vision
  • Ÿ  The gradual loss of your vision
  • Ÿ  Pain in your eye
  • Ÿ  Blurred vision
  • Ÿ  Fluctuations in your vision
  • Ÿ  Difficulty seeing at night
  • Ÿ  Floaters (dark spots or strings that appear to be floating in your vision)
  • Ÿ  Shadows or missing areas of your vision.