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Neapolitan Fever and Social Security Disability

Neapolitan fever is a serious infectious disease. Neapolitan fever results from one of four different species of bacteria that are a part of the genus Brucella.

Neapolitan fever may be local. If it is, it affects only a certain part of your body. However, Neapolitan fever can be extremely dangerous because it can have serious widespread complications that involve different organ systems in your body. This may include your central nervous system.

Neapolitan fever is usually a short-term (acute) disease. However, it may also be long-term (chronic) with long lasting complications.

Neapolitan fever is referred to in several other ways. It is also known as Maltese fever, brucellosis, undulant fever, Mediterranean fever, Bang’s disease, Crimean fever, Cyprus fever, Gibraltar fever, brucellemia, goat fever, rock fever, brucelliasis and melitococcosis.

Neapolitan fever is a disease that afflicts hundreds of thousands of animals and people every year in Mediterranean countries and other parts of the world. Neapolitan fever is not common in the United States. Somewhere around 100 to 200 cases of this disease are reported each year in the United States.

How Neapolitan Fever spreads

Neapolitan fever is a disease that involves many different wild and domestic animals. There are at least six strains of bacteria that lead to this disease in animals, but not all of these strains result in Neapolitan fever in humans. Neapolitan fever spreads from animals to people in three different ways. They are:

  • Ÿ  Eating raw dairy products that come from infected animals or eating raw or  undercooked meat that comes from an infected animal
  • Ÿ  Inhaling the brucella bacteria in the air
  • Ÿ  Direct contact with infected animals by way of a wound or cut that you have on your body.

 

The signs and symptoms of Neapolitan fever

It may begin anywhere from a matter of days to a few months after you have been infected with the brucella bacteria. There are several different signs and symptoms that you may experience, which may be an indication of Neapolitan fever. Some of these may include:

 

  • Ÿ  An undulating fever ( a fever that keeps rising and falling)
  • Ÿ  Chills
  • Ÿ  Sweats
  • Ÿ  Weakness
  • Ÿ  Fatigue
  • Ÿ  Headache
  • Ÿ  Joint, muscle and back pain.

The signs and symptoms that you have with Neapolitan fever may go away for weeks or months. Then they may come back again.

Neapolitan fever signs and symptoms

If you are afflicted with chronic Neapolitan fever, you may experience additional signs and symptoms. Some of these are:

  •  Ÿ Fevers
  • Ÿ  Chronic fatigue
  • Ÿ  Arthritis
  • Ÿ  Spondylitis (an inflammatory type of arthritis that affects your spine and joints that are near by)

Your doctor will likely do a physical exam, ask about your signs and symptoms and whether you have come in contact with animals, recently, in order to diagnose your Neapolitan fever. Your doctor may also ask you about what you have eaten over the past few weeks and months. Your doctor will probably test your blood or bone marrow for the brucella bacteria or antibodies to the bacteria in order for the diagnosis of Neapolitan fever to be confirmed.

Is the reason why you cannot work due to disability that has occurred as a result of Neapolitan fever and/or complications that have developed from it or other underlying conditions that you have in conjunction with this disease? As a result of your disability, have you tried to get financial help?

Have you put in a claim for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Has the Social Security Administration turned down  your claim?

If you have been thinking about reapplying or appealing your denial, the attorney at disabilitycasereview.com can be of great help to you. The disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com knows how to get the job done.

 

Burning Tongue Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Burning tongue syndrome is a disorder that is evidenced by pain in your mouth, tongue and/or lips. You may feel just as if your mouth has been scalded or burned with some type of hot liquid. Burning tongue syndrome may also be marked by a metallic or bitter taste in your mouth or a sore or dry mouth.

Burning tongue syndrome is referred to in other ways. It is also called stomatodynia, glossodynia, burning mouth syndrome, scalded mouth syndrome and burning lips syndrome.

Men and women are both affected by burning tongue syndrome, but it develops most often in women who are middle-aged and older. It occurs quite often in women during and after menopause. Burning tongue syndrome affects somewhere around 5% of the population of the United States.

Possible conditions indicating Burning Tongue Syndrome

Burning tongue syndrome may be associated with other underlying medical conditions. This disorder may also be an indication of other medical ailments. Some of these are:

  • Ÿ  As a complication of therapy for cancer
  • Ÿ  Deficiencies of things like vitamin B-12, iron, thiamin, pyridoxine, niacin, folate, or riboflavin
  • Ÿ  Irritation that comes as a result of dentures
  • Ÿ  Having had a recent illness, dental procedure or course of medication
  • Ÿ  The beginning of menopausal-hormonal changes
  • Ÿ  An oral yeast infection
  • Ÿ  Diabetes
  • Ÿ  Anemia

If the cause of your burning tongue syndrome cannot be found, the disorder is considered to be primary or idiopathic. What this means is that burning tongue syndrome has occurred independently of any other condition. Researchers think that idiopathic burning tongue syndrome may be associated with sensory and taste nerves of your central or peripheral nervous system.

When burning tongue syndrome is due to an underlying condition, it is known as secondary burning tongue syndrome. Underlying conditions that may lead to burning tongue syndrome include:

  •  Ÿ  Nutritional deficiencies
  • Ÿ  Nerve damage
  • Ÿ  Dry mouth (xerostomia)
  • Ÿ  Endocrine disorders, such as hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) and diabetes
  • Ÿ  Psychological factors like anxiety, depression or excessive health worries
  • Ÿ  Hormonal imbalances
  • Ÿ  Certain medications, such as high blood pressure medications like ACE inhibitors
  • Ÿ  Excessive irritation of your mouth
  • Ÿ  Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Ÿ  Allergies or reactions to dyes, fragrances, food additives or food flavorings
  • Ÿ  Wearing dentures
  • Ÿ  Oral habits, such as tongue thrusting or teeth grinding.

 

Risks and Signs that you may have Burning Tongue Syndrome

There are some risk factors that may increase your likelihood of developing burning tongue syndrome. Some of these are being a woman over the age of 50, traumatic events in life, previous dental procedures, an upper respiratory tract infection, stress, allergic reactions to food and having a high density of the small tongue bumps called papillae.

There are several different signs and symptom that may be caused by burning tongue syndrome. Some of these include:

  1. Ÿ  Changes in your eating habits
  2. Ÿ  Pain that may be spontaneous and gradual but that gets more severe as the day goes on
  3. Ÿ  A burning sensation in your tongue, mouth, lips and throat
  4. Ÿ  Loss of taste
  5. Ÿ  Alterations of your taste
  6. Ÿ  An increase in thirst
  7. Ÿ  Restlessness that may lead to things like anxiety, depression, irritability and mood changes
  8. Ÿ  A scalded feeling in your mouth
  9. Ÿ  Changes in the medications that you are taking
  10. Ÿ  Interference with your sleeping
  11. Ÿ  Dry mouth
  12. Ÿ  A metallic or bitter taste in your mouth

You may be disabled and unable to work because of complications that have been caused by burning tongue syndrome and/or other conditions that you also have along with this disorder. If so, do you need financial help?

Did you apply for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Were you denied?

If you plan on reapplying or appealing your denial, your really should have the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com on your side. The disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com can get you the disability benefits that you have coming to you.

Scalded Mouth Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Scalded mouth syndrome is an ailment that is marked by pain in your lips, mouth and/or tongue. You may feel as though your mouth has been burned or scalded with some kind of hot liquid. Scalded mouth syndrome may also be characterized by a bitter or metallic taste in your mouth or a dry or sore mouth.

Scalded mouth syndrome is known by other names. It is also referred to as glossodynia, stomatodynia, burning mouth syndrome, burning lips syndrome and burning tongue syndrome.

Although anyone of any age can get scalded mouth syndrome, it occurs most of the time in women who are middle-aged and older. It takes place many times in women during and after menopause. About 5% of the population of the United States has scalded mouth syndrome.

Medical problems associated with Scalded Mouth Syndrome

Scalded mouth syndrome may be an indication of other medical problems. It may also be associated with other underlying medical difficulties. Some of these include:

  • Ÿ  Irritation that comes from dentures
  • Ÿ  An oral yeast infection
  • Ÿ  Anemia
  • Ÿ  As a complication of therapy for cancer
  • Ÿ  Diabetes
  • Ÿ  The beginning of menopausal-hormonal changes
  • Ÿ  Deficiencies of things like niacin, vitamin B-12, riboflavin, iron, thiamin, pyridoxine or folate
  • Ÿ  Having had a recent course of medication, illness or dental procedure.

If the reason for your scalded mouth syndrome is not known, the ailment is referred to as being idiopathic or primary. This means that scalded mouth syndrome has developed independently of any other medical problem. Scientists believe that scalded mouth syndrome may be connected with sensory and taste nerves of your peripheral or central nervous system.

Secondary conditions of Scalded Mouth Syndrome

When scalded mouth syndrome is caused by another medical condition, it is called secondary scalded mouth syndrome. Underlying conditions that may result in scalded mouth syndrome are:

  • Ÿ  Oral habits, such as teeth grinding or tongue thrusting
  • Ÿ  Hormonal imbalances
  • Ÿ  Endocrine conditions like diabetes or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid)
  • Ÿ  Nutritional deficiencies
  • Ÿ  Allergies or reactions to fragrances, food flavorings, dyes or food additives
  • Ÿ  Nerve damage
  • Ÿ  Wearing dentures
  • Ÿ  Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Ÿ  Dry mouth (xerostomia)
  • Ÿ  Psychological factors like anxiety, depression or excessive health worries
  • Ÿ  Excessive mouth irritation
  • Ÿ  Certain medications, such as high blood pressure medications like ACE inhibitors.

Risk factors and signs of scalded mouth syndrome

There are some risk factors that may increase your risk of getting scalded mouth syndrome. Some of these include stress, having a high density of the small tongue bumps known as papillae, being a woman over the age of 50, an upper respiratory tract infection, allergic reactions to food, traumatic events in life and previous dental procedures.

There are several different signs and symptoms that you may experience with scalded mouth syndrome. Some of these are:

  1. Ÿ  Restlessness that may result in things like irritability, mood changes, anxiety and depression
  2. Ÿ  An increase in thirst
  3. Ÿ  Interference with your sleep
  4. Ÿ  Changes in your eating habits
  5. Ÿ  A bitter or metallic taste in your mouth
  6. Ÿ  Pain that may be spontaneous and gradual but that becomes more severe as the day progresses
  7. Ÿ  Dry mouth
  8. Ÿ  A burning sensation in your tongue, mouth, lips and throat
  9. Ÿ  Changes in the medications that you are taking
  10. Ÿ  A scalded feeling in your mouth
  11. Ÿ  Alterations of your taste
  12. Ÿ  Loss of taste.

You may have become incapacitated and not be able to work due to complications that have developed from scalded mouth syndrome and/or other disorders that you have besides this ailment. If this is the case, are you looking for financial aid?

Have you filed for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Have you been turned down?

Are you thinking about reapplying or appealing your denial? If you do, you really need the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com in your corner. The disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com can help you receive the disability benefits that you deserve.

Chest Discomfort and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

It could happen at any time. It may occur in the middle of a busy workday. It may take place in the middle of the night. All of a sudden, you begin to experience chest discomfort. You hope that it stops; or you try to ignore it, but it will not go away.

What do you do now? What can you do? What should you do?

One of the most frightening things you can ever have is chest discomfort. You may start to think, “Am I having a heart attack? What should I do? Should I call 911? Should I go to the emergency room at the hospital? Should I wait awhile and see if it goes away?”

Chest discomfort is one of the main reasons why people go to the hospital emergency room. Each year, in the United States, millions of people are evaluated and treated by emergency room doctors because of chest discomfort.

Chest discomfort is a condition that should always be taken with great seriousness. It may be extremely deadly and dangerous to ignore chest discomfort and not do anything about it.

It may be comforting to know that chest discomfort is not always a sign or indication of an approaching heart attack. In many instances, your chest discomfort may not be related to any kind of heart problem. However, even when your chest discomfort is not related to your heart, it may still be an indication of a serious medical problem.

The effects produced by chest discomfort are different according to what is responsible for it. If your chest discomfort is related to your heart, it may be a sign of:

  • Ÿ  Angina, which can cause recurrent episodes of chest discomfort
  • Ÿ  Aortic dissection, which may cause a sudden, tearing chest discomfort, as well as back discomfort
  • Ÿ  Coronary artery spasm that produces varying degrees of chest discomfort
  • Ÿ  Pericarditis, which causes a sharp, piercing centralized chest discomfort
  • Ÿ  A heart attack that causes pressure, fullness or a crushing chest discomfort that lasts longer than a few minutes.

Non-heart related chest discomfort may be a sign or symptom of:

  • Ÿ  A panic attack, which causes chest discomfort, as well as rapid heartbeat and breathing, profuse sweating, intense fear and shortness of breath
  • Ÿ  Pancreas or gallbladder problems that cause abdominal pain that radiates (moves) to your chest
  • Ÿ  Sore muscles that usually produce chest discomfort when you raise your arms or twist from side to side
  • Ÿ  Shingles, which can cause a sharp, burning chest discomfort
  • Ÿ  Esophageal spasms
  • Ÿ  Pinched nerves or injured ribs
  • Ÿ  Pleurisy, which produces a sharp, localized chest discomfort that gets worse when you inhale or cough
  • Ÿ  Achalasia (a food disorder that causes food to back up into your esophagus)
  • Ÿ  Costochondritis (a type of arthritis that affects your breastbone and causes sharp, localized chest discomfort)
  • Ÿ  Pulmonary embolism, which causes a sharp, sudden chest pain that gets worse when you take a deep breath or cough
  • Ÿ  Heartburn.

Are you disabled and cannot work as a result of complications that have been brought about by whatever the underlying condition or disorder is that is causing your chest discomfort? If this is the case, are you in need of financial aid?

Are you planning on filing a request for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Have you already applied and been turned down by the Social Security Administration?

If you are intending to appeal your denial or reapply, you need to seriously consider being represented by the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com. The disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com knows how to work with the Social Security Administration and can get you all of the disability benefits that you have coming to you.

Do not put this off. Check out disabilitycasereview.com, today.

Earning Work Credits for SSDI Disability Benefits

Often claimants who have filed for SSDI benefits are told by the Social Security Claims Representative or receive a letter from Social Security in the mail informing them they do not have enough work credits to qualify for SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance).

Almost all state they have worked their whole life, up until a few years ago, when they became ill and could only work part-time, or had to stop working, or worked sporadically and do not understand if they worked for a long period in the past why they are not eligible for SSDI.

Most Americans are unaware that in addition to meeting Social Security’s definition of disability you must have worked long enough –AND recently enough earning the required number of work credits within a certain period ending with the time you became disabled under Social Security to qualify for SSDI benefits.

Social Security measures work in “work credits.” You can earn up to 4 work credits per year based on the annual earnings. The amount of earnings required for a work credit increases each year as general wage levels rise.

The amount needed for a credit changes from year to year. In 2011, you earned one credit for each $1,120 of wages or self-employment income. When you’ve earned $4,480, you’ve earned your four credits for the year. In 2012, you will earn one credit for each $1130 in covered earnings wages to get one Social Security credit. When you’ve earned $4,520, you’ve earned your four credits for the year.

The number of work credits you need for SSDI benefits varies depending on your age and when you became disabled.

Workers over the age of 31 years old generally need 20 work credits earned in the last 10 years ending with the year they became disabled.

Workers who became disabled between the age of 24 – 31 years of age may qualify if they worked half the time between the age 21 and the time they became disabled, for example, if a claimant became disabled at age 27, the claimant would need credit for 3 years work (12 work credits) out of the past 6 years (between ages 21 and 27).

Workers who became disabled before the age of 24 years old may qualify for SSDI benefits if they have the minimum of 6 work credits earned in the 3 year period ending when your disability starts.

Most individuals filing for disability do not know their DLI (date last insured), AOD (alleged onset date – the date you believe you became disabled), and SGA (substantial gainful activity) / SGI (substantial gainful income) and how the correlation between these factors effect eligibility for SSDI.
The amending of an onset date or applying SGA rules to a claim requires a seasoned veteran whose daily ritual includes cutting thru Social Security’s red tape and is one of the best reasons to retain an attorney who works with Social Security Disability claims at all levels including the initial stage.

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A Cystocele and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Anatomy of Urinary bladder

Image via Wikipedia

The main task of your bladder is to store and release urine. Nerves that are located in your bladder tell you when it is time to empty your bladder (urinate).

A cystocele is a medical condition that develops when the fibrous wall between your vagina and your bladder becomes weakened and permits your bladder to droop into your vagina.

A cystocele may cause two kinds of problems. They are incomplete emptying of your bladder and unwanted urine leakage. A cystocele stretches the opening into your urethra. This can result in urine leakage whenever you laugh, cough, sneeze or move in any way that puts pressure on your bladder.

The severity of a cystocele is determined by three grades. Grade 1 is considered to be a mild cystocele. This is where your bladder droops only a little way into your vagina. Grade 2 is more severe. In this case, your bladder droops far enough to reach the opening of your vagina. Grade 3 is the most severe form of a cystocele. This is when your bladder bulges out through the opening of your vagina.

A cystocele is referred to in other ways. It is also known as a fallen bladder, prolapsed bladder, anterior prolapse or bladder prolapse.

When your cystocele is mild (grade 1), you may not notice any signs or symptoms. However, with more severe cystoceles, possible signs and symptoms are:

  • Loss of urinary control when you sneeze, cough or laugh
  • Not being able to control urination in severe cases
  • Increase in your discomfort when you cough, strain, lift or bow down
  • A feeling of pressure or fullness in your vagina and pelvis, especially when you stand for a long period of time
  • A bulge of tissue that protrudes through your vaginal opening
  • Urinary leakage or pain during sexual intercourse
  • Recurrent bladder infections.

A cystocele would not usually be a condition that would qualify you to receive Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits. However, you or a loved one may have complications resulting from a cystocele, or you may have other disabling disorders along with this condition that have caused you to be disabled and unable to work.

If this is your situation, you may need help. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may intend to apply for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by a cystocele and the complications resulting from it or the other disorders that you have along with this condition. You or your loved one may have already applied and been denied by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one plans on reapplying or appealing the denial, remember this important fact. The simple truth is that people who have a disability lawyer standing with them like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.

Please do not delay. Contact the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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