Tag Archives: Blood pressure

High Blood Pressure and receiving Social Security Disability

Main complications of persistent high blood pr...

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The Social Security Administration provides two disability programs- Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). To qualify for either program based on a disability, you will need to prove you have a disabling mental or physical health condition which is so severe you will be unable to perform “substantial activity” for at least 12 continuous months.

So can you get SSDI or SSI disability benefits for high blood pressure. Hypertension is listed as a specific impairment listing under section 4.03 of the SSA Listing of Impairments (SSA Bluebook), titled Hypertensive Cardiovascular disease.

The Social Security Administration will evaluate your high blood pressure as it related to other chronic conditions such as coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure. You may also receive disability if you can prove that the hypertensive condition has caused severe damage to your kidneys, eyes or brain.

Keep in mind the SSA is less concerned with your specific diagnosis and more concerned about whether or not you have the functional capacity to perform substantial activity or work.

What is High Blood Pressure?

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, refers to the pressure of the blood as it is pumped through the arteries or vessels, which carry the blood from an individual’s heart to the organs and tissues of the body.

Blood pressure is rated as normal below 120/80 and pre-hypertensive from 120/80 to 139/89. If an individual’s blood pressure is 140/90 or above, they are said to have “high blood pressure”.

So what do these numbers actually mean? The top number is called the systolic blood pressure and refers to the pressure of the arteries as the heart contracts and pushes the blood through arteries. The lower number or diastolic pressure refers to the pressure of the arteries after the contraction.

Approximately one in three adults suffers from high blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association. This means that over 73 million Americans are at risk for cardiac disease, renal disease, eye injury, and hardening of the arteries. Given the prevalence of high blood pressure, it has been labeled as a national public health problem.

Scientists have studied high blood pressure for years and attempted to determine whether creating an eating plan could help reduce it. At the conclusion of their studies, they determined there was such a plan, and they termed it the DASH Diet eating plan. Scientific studies confirmed by following the DASH Diet and combining it with other changes such as daily physical exercise, participants could lower, prevent, or control their blood pressure.

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Pancreatitis and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

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Your pancreas is a long, flat gland that is tucked behind your stomach, between the upper part of your small intestine (duodenum) and your spleen. Your pancreas is important for both metabolism and digestion.

These functions of metabolism and digestion may be affected by pancreatitis.  Pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that occurs when pancreatic digestive enzymes become active within your gland and attack your pancreas, itself.

There are 2 kinds of pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis appears quickly and only lasts for a few days. Chronic pancreatitis develops slowly and continues for many years. Both acute and chronic pancreatitis can lead to serious complications.

You may wonder how big a problem pancreatitis is. Somewhere around 80,000 cases occur each year in the United States. Pancreatitis is more common in men than in women.

The number one cause of pancreatitis is gallstones. The second most common cause is excessive use of alcohol. There are also several other causes of pancreatitis including trauma to your abdomen, steroids, mumps, scorpion venom, various medications, environment, genetics and autoimmune causes where your body’s defense mechanisms attack your own body.

There are some risk factors that may increase your likelihood of getting pancreatitis.  Since excessive use of alcohol is the second leading cause of this disease, drinking alcohol excessively increases your risk of getting pancreatitis. Other risk factors are:

  • Ethnicity
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Gender
  • Genetic mutations
  • Other medical conditions.

There are several ways that you may be affected by pancreatitis. Some of these effects are:

  • Severe upper abdominal pain that radiates through to your back is the hallmark sign of pancreatitis.
  • Nausea and vomiting are also prominent symptoms of this disease.
  • Fever is an indicator of pancreatitis.
  • Rapid pulse can also be a sign of this disorder.
  • Low blood pressure and dehydration, shock and internal bleeding are symptoms of a severe case of pancreatitis.

You or a loved one may have pancreatitis. This disease may be the cause of your disability and the reason why you are not able to work.

As a result, you or your loved one may need assistance. You may need financial help.

Where will the help that you need come from? Who will be able to help you? Who can you call on?

Have you or your loved one applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by pancreatitis? Were you or your loved one denied?

You or your loved one may decide to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do, think about this.

You or your loved one may need a disability lawyer like the one you will find at Social Security Home to assist you in the appeals process. This is true because people represented by a disability attorney are approved more often than those people without a lawyer.

Binswanger’s Disease and Receiving Social Security Disability

Otto Binswanger
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The term dementia describes a medical condition that is caused by changes in the normal activity of very sensitive brain cells. These changes in the way the brain works can affect memory, speech and the ability to carry out daily activities.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia in older people. The second most common cause of dementia in older adults is vascular dementia. This type of dementia affects the blood vessels in the brain.

Multi-infarct dementia is the most common form of vascular dementia. It accounts for 10-20% of all the cases of progressive, or gradually worsening, dementia.

It usually affects people between the ages of 60-75. Multi-infarct dementia is more likely to occur in men than women.

Binswanger’s disease is named after Otto Binswanger. It is also called subcortical leukoencephalopathy. In 1894, he described a new clinical and neuropathological picture that he termed “encephalitis subcorticalis chronica progressiva,”.  It is this disease that is named after him, Binswanger’s disease. This disease is a rare form of multi-infarct/vascular dementia.

Some of the ways that Binswanger’s disease may affect your loved one is by causing cerebrovascular lesions in the deep white-matter of their brain, loss of memory and cognition and mood changes. Your loved one will usually show signs of abnormal blood pressure, blood abnormalities, stroke, disease of the heart valves and disease of the large blood vessels in the neck.

There are other ways in which Binswanger’s disease may affect your loved one. Some of these include:

  • Slowness of conduct
  • Clumsiness
  • Difficulty walking
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Lack of facial expression
  • Speech difficulty
  • Forgetfulness
  • Changes in personality or mood
  • Short-term memory loss
  • Inability to act or make decisions.

These signs and symptoms usually begin after the age of 60. They are not always present in all the people with Binswanger’s disease, and may sometimes appear only as a passing phase.

If this describes a parent or loved one, you may have applied for financial help on their behalf from the Social Security Administration for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by Binswanger’s disease. Was your parent or loved one denied by the Social Security Administration?

If so, you may be trying to decide what to do next? What options do you have?

One thing that you can do is to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration. If this is what you decide to do on behalf of your parent or loved one, consider this.

Your parent or loved one will need the representation of a smart disability lawyer like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com in this procedure. The reason for this is because people who have a skilled disability attorney are approved more often than those people who do not have a lawyer.

Primary Aldosteronism and Receiving Social Security Disability

Primary aldosteronism is a condition in which the adrenal glands of your body produce too much of the hormone aldosterone. When this happens it causes you to retain sodium and lose potassium.

These two minerals, when working together properly, transmit nerve impulses, relax and contract your muscles and help maintain the right balance of fluids in your body. Too much aldosterone causes you to retain sodium. Too much sodium causes excessive water retention. This, then, increases your blood volume and blood pressure. The problems of high blood pressure (hypertension) are life-threatening.

Primary aldosteronism was once thought of as rare by doctors. Because screening for primary aldosteronism has become more common, there is now evidence that this condition may be responsible for as many as one in eight cases of high blood pressure.

The World Health Organization says that there are approximately 600 million people around the world with high blood pressure. That means that 60 to 90 million people worldwide probably have primary aldosteronism. There may be anywhere from 7 to 11 million people who have this condition in the United States.

There are some effects that primary aldosteronism will have on you. The most predominant effect of this condition is high blood pressure that does not completely respond to medication. Other main effects of this condition are hypokalemia (low potassium) and having a benign tumor on one or both of your adrenal glands.

There are other effects that you may experience which are not as common. Some of these include:

  • Fatigue
  • Numbness
  • Excessive thirst
  • Excessive urination
  • Headache
  • Tingling, pricking sensation
  • Temporary paralysis
  • Muscle cramps and weakness.

There are some serious, life-threatening complications of primary aldosteronism. If your high blood pressure is not treated it can lead to stroke, kidney disease or failure, heart failure, heart attack, another heart condition known as left ventricular hypertrophy and premature death.

Low potassium leads to other complications. These include excessive urination, cardiac arrhythmias, fatigue and muscle cramps.

Primary aldosteronism and/or complications along with or resulting from this condition may be why you or a loved one is unable to work. This disorder may be the cause of your disability.

You may be in need of help. You may need financial aid.

Have you or your loved one already applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration and been denied? Are you wondering what to do now? Do you know your options?

You or your loved one may be thinking about appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do, think about this.

You or your loved one may need a disability lawyer like the one at disabilitycasereview.com to help you in this process. This is true because people who are represented by a disability attorney are approved more often than those people who are without a lawyer.

Orthostatic Hypotension and Receiving Social Security Disability

Your blood pressure reading is important, but what exactly is blood pressure? Blood is transported away from your heart to every part of your body through your arteries. Blood pressure is the force of the blood as it pushes against the walls of your arteries. Every time your heart beats (about 60–70 times a minute at rest), it pumps blood into your arteries.

When your heart beats, pumping the blood, your blood pressure is at its highest. This is referred to as your systolic pressure. Your blood pressure falls when your heart is at rest, between beats. This is called your diastolic pressure. Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury.

When your blood pressure is written down, these numbers are either written one after another or on top of one another. Your systolic is always first, or the top number. The diastolic is second, or the bottom number.  For example, if your blood pressure were 120/80 mmHg, you would say that it is, “120 over 80.”

Low blood pressure is also known as hypotension. This is in contrast to high blood pressure, which is known as hypertension.

Your blood pressure is considered to be normal if it is below 120/80. Usually, low blood pressure is something you would like to have. However, low blood pressure can cause signs and symptoms or be an indication of serious, severe disorders and conditions.

Blood pressure varies from one person to another. However, you are considered to have low blood pressure if it is less that 90/60.

There are different types of low blood pressure. Orthostatic hypotension, which is also referred to as postural hypotension, is one kind of low blood pressure.

Orthostatic hypotension occurs when you stand up from a position of lying down or sitting. While it can occur in anyone, orthostatic hypotension happens most often to older adults.

The most common sign or symptom of orthostatic hypotension is feeling dizzy or lightheaded when you stand up. You may even faint (syncope). Other signs and symptoms that you may have are:

  • Confusion
  • Headache
  • Weakness
  • Nausea
  • Blurry vision.

You or your loved one may have orthostatic hypotension. This condition and/or whatever the underlying cause of it is may be the reason why you or your loved one is disabled and needing financial help.

You or your loved one may be planning on applying for financial assistance from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by orthostatic hypotension and/or whatever the condition is that is causing it. You or your loved one may have already done this and been denied.

If you or your loved one is thinking about appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration, remember this. People who have a disability attorney like the one at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability lawyer.

Please do not hesitate. Contact us today.

Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease and Receiving Social Security Disability

Your kidneys play an important role in the way your body functions, not only by filtering your blood and getting rid of waste products, but also by balancing levels of electrolytes in your body, stimulating the production of red blood cells and controlling blood pressure. Your kidneys are located in your abdomen toward the back. Normally, one is located on each side of your spine. Their blood supply comes through the renal arteries directly from your aorta, and they transport blood back to your heart through the renal veins to the vena cava. (The term “renal” is derived from the Latin name for kidney.)

Sensors within your kidneys decide how much water to excrete as urine, along with what concentration of electrolytes when blood flows to your kidneys. For example, if you are dehydrated from exercise or an illness, your kidneys will retain as much water as possible, and your urine will become extremely concentrated. Your urine becomes much more dilute, and your urine becomes clear when you have enough water in your body.

Medullary cystic kidney disease is an inherited disorder. This disease is characterized by cysts that develop in the center of each of your kidneys. The result is a gradual loss of your kidneys ability to function.

There are signs and symptoms that you may experience in the early stages of medullary cystic kidney disease. These include:

  • Nocturia (urinating during the night)
  • Weakness
  • Salt cravings
  • Polyuria (excessive urination)
  • Low blood pressure.

In the advanced stages of this disease, you may have signs and symptoms of kidney failure that include:

  • Malaise (general sick feeling)
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Seizures
  • Delirium
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Decreased alertness
  • Blood in your stool or vomiting blood
  • Coma
  • Confusion
  • Muscle cramps or twitching
  • Drowsiness
  • Extreme sleepiness
  • Bleeding or bruising easily
  • Frequent hiccups
  • Increased skin pigmentation that may appear brown or yellow
  • Reduced sensation in your feet, hands or other areas.

You or a loved one may be suffering from medullary cystic kidney disease. This disease and/or complications arising from or along with it may be why you are disabled and unable to work.

You may need help if this is your situation. You may need financial assistance.

Are you or your loved one planning on applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by medullary cystic kidney disease and/or complications resulting from or along with it? Were you or your loved one denied?

If you intend to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration, think this over very carefully. People who are represented by a disability attorney are approved more often than those people who are without a lawyer.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Our word “aneurysm” is taken from the Greek “aneurysma”. This means, “a widening”. An aneurysm is a blood vessel that balloons outward or becomes abnormally large. Your blood vessel bulges out like a weak spot on an old worn tire when this happens. This bulge can burst and lead to death at any time. The larger the aneurysm is, the greater the danger is of it rupturing.

An aortic aneurysm happens on your aorta. The aorta is one of the large arteries that carry blood from your heart to the rest of your body. Your aorta bulges at the site of the aneurysm.

Aortic aneurysms can take place anywhere along the length of your aorta. However, the majority of aortic aneurysms develop along your abdominal aorta. Most (about 90%) of abdominal aneurysms are located below the level of your renal arteries. These are the vessels that leave your aorta and go to your kidneys. About two-thirds of abdominal aneurysms also extend from the aorta into one or both of your iliac arteries. The iliac arteries are the arteries that go to your legs.

The most noticeable effect that an abdominal aortic aneurysm will have on you is pain. Usually this pain has a deep quality to it, as if it were boring into you. This pain is most commonly felt in your lower abdomen and back region. The pain is steady but can usually be relieved by changing position.

You may also experience an abnormally noticeable abdominal pulsation. Sudden onset of abdominal and back pain, shock and low blood pressure can occur with a rapidly expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm. This is also a sign of the imminent risk of rupture taking place.

The threat and risk of death is high with abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, you or a loved one may have survived this disorder. Because of abdominal aortic aneurysm and/or other conditions and complications, you or your loved one may be disabled and unable to work.

As a result, you or your loved one may be eligible to receive Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration. The disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com is the one who can best advise you about this.

Your or your loved one may have already applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration and been denied. You may be wondering what options are open to you, now.

If you or your loved one plans on appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration, you will need a disability attorney like the one at disabilitycasereview.com to counsel and guide you in this process. This is true because people who have a disability lawyer on their side are approved more often than those people who are not represented by an attorney.

Do not hesitate. This is a matter of great importance. Contact the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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