Tag Archives: Cancer

Brain tumor why can’t I get partial SSDI benefits?

Recently on our legal forum a user asked, “I have been recently diagnosed with a brain tumor. I will be undergoing treatment and would ideally like to start working part-time and receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits to compensate me partially for my lost income. I have talked to a few people at the SSA, and I am starting to understand this may not be possible. Can you help me understand what SSDI can do for me and what I have to do to qualify for this benefit I have been paying for the last 20 years?”

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SSDI reinstatement for cancer

Recently on our legal forum a user asked, “I used to get Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) for cancer. I recovered and my cancer went into remission. Now it’s back and I don’t think I can continue to work while I fight it. I was wondering whether or not I might qualify for an expedited SSDI reinstatement or do I have to go through the whole process of applying again and waiting months to receive my benefits?”

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HIV and medical information I need to win SSDI?

Recently on our disability forum a user asked, “I have been diagnosed with HIV, and I do not think I can work. I heard that I might qualify for SSDI benefits. What information does the Social Security Administration (SSA) need to evaluate and process my claim? I want to win the first time I apply and not have to appeal my denial over and over again.”

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Severe disability why was I denied SSDI benefits?

Some claimants with a severe disability such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, or a back injury mistakenly believe that all they need to do to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is to complete the application, send it to the SSA, sit back, and wait for the benefits. Unfortunately, winning SSDI benefits, even for a severe disability, can be much more complicated, and you can be denied for a variety of reasons. Below we will discuss some of the most common reasons:

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A Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor and Social Security

Cancer is far more than a single disease. Cancer is a large group of disorders. These diseases are evidenced by cells that are invasive (they invade and destroy adjacent tissue), aggressive (they divide and grow without respect to normal limits) and sometimes metastatic (they move to other areas of the body).

There are many different forms of cancer. They are usually named by where they start in your body. For example, pancreatic cancer begins in your pancreas. Esophageal cancer originates in your esophagus. Cancer may often spread to other places in your body, but it is still called by where it started.

Cancer is also classified by the type of cell that the tumor looks like. Some examples of this are lymphoma, carcinoma, blastic tumor, sarcoma and germ cell tumor.

A primitive neuroectodermal tumor is one of a group of cancers that shares certain genetic and biochemical features and arises from the same kind of early cells as a family of cancers that are known as Ewing’s sarcoma. Ewing’s sarcoma usually originates in your bone, while a primitive neuroectodermal tumor usually begins in your soft tissue. If you have been diagnosed with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor, this may enable you to receive social security disability benefits like SSDI or SSI. A wise decision is to consult the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com to find out the options that are available to you. The social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com are experienced in matters involving disability benefits. Go to disabilitycasereview.com, today.

In many instances, a primitive neuroectodermal tumor will develop in your central nervous system and brain. In other cases, a primitive neuroectodermal tumor may take place in areas outside of your brain, such as your chest wall, pelvis or limbs.

Fortunately, a primitive neuroectodermal tumor is rare in the United States. A primitive neuroectodermal tumor is responsible for somewhere around 25% of the brain tumors that take place in children. Around 8 out of every 1 million children are affected by a primitive neuroectodermal tumor each year in the United States. Most of the time, this tumor takes place in children or adults who are under the age of 25.

A primitive neuroectodermal tumor is brought about by cells that mutate and begin to multiply and grow out of control. However, no one has yet discovered why this starts to take place. It is believed by researchers that genetics may play a significant role is leading to this form of cancer.

There are several different signs and symptoms that may be produced by a primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Some of the possible signs and symptoms are:

  • Facial weakness
  • Memory loss
  • Problems with talking
  • A change in your vision
  • Vomiting, nausea and headaches that slowly get worse
  • Weakness in one of your arms or legs
  • Difficulty walking
  • Numbness in one of your arms or legs
  • A change in behavior or personality
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of coordination
  • Hearing loss
  • Unexplained weight gain or weight loss
  • Unusual sleepiness or change in your energy level
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Familial polyposis Coli and Receiving Social Security Disability

Cancer is much larger and wider than one disorder. Cancer involves many different diseases. Cancer is marked by cells that are invasive (they invade and destroy adjacent tissue), aggressive (they grow and divide without respect to normal limits) and sometimes metastatic (they spread to other parts of the body).

There are many different forms of cancer. They are usually designated by where they start in your body. For instance, gall bladder cancer originates in your gall bladder. Kidney cancer starts in your kidneys. As you probably are aware, cancer may metastasize (spread) to other areas of your body, but it is still called by where it began in your body.

Colon cancer is one of the many forms of cancer. Colon cancer is also known as colorectal cancer. Colon cancer originates in your large intestine (colon). Rectal cancer starts in the last several inches of your colon. This is the part of your rectum that is close to your anus. When these cancers are considered together, they are known as colorectal cancers.

Familial polyposis coli is a kind of colorectal cancer. Familial polyposis coli is marked by anywhere from hundreds to thousands of polyps developing in your colon. If you have been diagnosed with familial polyposis coli, this may enable you to get social security disability benefits such as SSDI or SSI. What you really ought to do is to contact one of the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com to see what they have to say. The social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com know how to deal with the Social Security Administration in the matter of disability benefits.

Familial polyposis coli is referred to in several other ways. It is also known as colon cancer, familial, FAP, Familial polyposis syndrome, polyposis coli, familial intestinal polyposis, familial multiple polyposis syndrome and MYH-associated polyposis, to name some of the other ways in which this disorder is designated.

Familial polyposis coli is an inherited colorectal cancer syndrome. Familial is used to show that this disease runs in families. Polyposis refers to the fact that anywhere from hundreds to thousands of polyps may form in your colon. Coli is used for bacteria that inhabits your colon or intestine.

The third most common form of cancer in both men and women in the United States is colon cancer. Familial polyposis coli accounts for somewhere around 1% of all the cases of colorectal cancer.

Familial polyposis coli is brought about by a mutation (defect) that occurs in the adenomatous polyposis APC (coli) gene that is located on chromosome No. 5. At the present time, no one knows for sure what leads to this defect taking place.

Familial polyposis coli may not result in any signs or symptoms at all. However, when the disorder progresses, some of the signs and symptoms that you may have include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • A change in your bowel habits
  • Weight loss that is unintentional
  • Anemia (a lack of healthy red blood cells)
  • Bleeding that occurs from your rectum
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Ocular Melanoma and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Your cells are the building blocks from which your body is formed. This is where cancer originates. If your body is working properly, old cells die at the right time and new cells replace them when you need them. However, sometimes old cells do not die like they ought to and new cells are produced when you do not need them.

A tumor (mass) can originate with these excess cells. These tumors may be either benign or malignant. If they are benign, they are not cancer. If they are malignant, they are cancer.

Cancer is far greater than one disorder. It is a huge category of diseases. Cancer involves cells that are invasive (they invade and destroy adjacent tissue), aggressive (they grow and divide without respect to normal limits) and sometimes metastatic (they spread to other areas of your body).

There are many different kinds of cancer. They are usually called by where they originated in your body. For example, stomach cancer begins in your stomach. Skin cancer begins in the cells of your skin. Even though the cancer may spread (metastasize) to other areas of your body, it is still designated by where it originated.

Cancer is also arranged by the type of cell that the tumor looks like. Some examples of this are germ cell tumor, lymphoma, blastic tumor, sarcoma and carcinoma.

Melanoma is a type of cancer that originates in the cells of your body that produce melanin. Melanin is the pigment that determines what color your skin will be.

Your eyes also contain melanin-producing cells. Ocular melanoma is cancer that begins in the melanin-producing cells in your eye. Are you disabled because of ocular melanoma? As a result, you may be entitled to social security disability benefits like SSI or SSDI. A great way to check on this is by going to one of the social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com. The social security attorneys at disabilitycasereview.com know how to help you when it comes to obtaining disability benefits.

Ocular melanoma is referred to in other ways. It is also known as intraocular melanoma and eye melanoma.

Occur melanoma develops as a result of errors that occur in the DNA of healthy eye cells. However, what causes these errors to take place has not yet been determined.

There are some risk factors that may increase your likelihood of getting ocular melanoma. Some of these are:

  • Being white
  • Getting older
  • Having a light eye color
  • Inheriting certain skin disorders
  • Prolonged exposure to the sun

As is true of some other kinds of cancer, ocular melanoma may not result in any signs or symptoms. If you do have signs and symptoms, they may include:

  • Poor or blurry vision in your affected eye
  • A change in your vision
  • A sensation of flashing lights
  • A change in the shape of the dark circle (your pupil) at the center of your eye
  • A growing dark spot on your iris
  • A loss of vision in your affected eye

    social security disability benefits and Ocular Melanoma

    You may qualify for social security disability benefits if you have Ocular Melanoma

 

 

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Osteogenic Sarcoma and Receiving Social Security Disability

osteogenic sarcoma and social security disability

Image via Wikipedia

Cancer is a large group of diseases. It is not one single disease. These diseases are marked by cells that are invasive (they invade and destroy adjacent tissue), aggressive (they grow and divide without respect to normal limits) and sometimes metastatic (they spread to other parts of the body).

There are many different types of cancer. They are usually named by where they originate in your body. For example, liver cancer begins in your liver. Stomach cancer starts in your stomach. Even though cancer may metastasize (spread) to other areas of your body, it is still called by where it originated.

Cancer is also designated by the type of cell that the tumor looks like. Some examples of this are germ cell tumor, lymphoma, blastic tumor, carcinoma and sarcoma.

Bone cancer starts in your bones. Your body contains 206 bones. Your bones provide shape and structure to your body.

Your bones have three major tasks. They help contain bone marrow that makes and stores new blood cells, help protect your fragile organs and control your body’s collection of various nutrients and proteins.

Osteogenic sarcoma is a form of bone cancer that usually develops from osteoblasts. These are the cells that produce growing bone. Osteogenic sarcoma usually affects teenagers who are having a growth spurt. Boys are affected more than girls.

Osteogenic sarcoma is the most common kind of bone cancer. It is the sixth most common cancer in children, but it can develop in anyone at any age.

Sometimes, the first sign or symptom of osteogenic sarcoma is a broken arm or leg. This comes as a result of the cancer weakening a bone and making it susceptible to a break (fracture).

The signs and symptoms of osteogenic sarcoma that occur most often are pain and swelling in your arm or leg. This usually takes place in the longer bones of your body, such as in your upper arm close to your shoulder or above or beneath your knee. Other possible signs and symptoms include:

Ÿ  Tenderness or redness at the site of the tumor

Ÿ  Walking with a limp if the affected area is your leg

Ÿ  Swelling or a lump that develops in the affected area

Ÿ  Pain when you lift anything if the affected area is in your arm

Ÿ  Pain that gets worse during exercise or at night

Ÿ  Pain that wakes you up in the night or while you are at rest.

You or a loved one may be afflicted with osteogenic sarcoma. Osteogenic sarcoma and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other illnesses that you have besides this disease may have resulted in you or your loved one’s disability and not being able to work.

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