Tag Archives: Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Histiocytic Lymphoma and Receiving Social Security Disability

The lymphatic system, lymph vessels and lymph ...

Image via Wikipedia

Your lymphatic system is composed of a network of thin lymphatic vessels that branch into tissues all through your body like blood vessels. These lymphatic vessels carry a watery, colorless fluid called lymph. Lymph contains infection-fighting cells that are known as lymphocytes.

Small organs that are called lymph nodes are situated along this network of vessels. Clusters of these lymph nodes are located in your abdomen, groin, chest, neck and underarms. Lymphatic tissue is found in your stomach, intestines and skin. Your tonsils, spleen, thymus and bone marrow are also a part of your lymphatic system.

White blood cells are made by your lymphatic system. These white blood cells are known as lymphocytes. They do the critical job of guarding you from infectious invaders like bacteria, fungi and viruses.

Lymphoma develops as a result of these lymphocytes beginning to multiply uncontrollably. They make malignant cells that have the abnormal ability to invade other tissues throughout your body.

Lymphomas are cancers that start in your lymphatic system. There are two main types of lymphoma.

Histiocytic lymphoma is one of these two main kinds of lymphoma. The other is Hodgkin’s disease.

Hodgkin’s disease only accounts for about 1% of all the cancers in the United States. Unfortunately, histiocytic lymphoma is one of the more common cancers in the United States. It is the fifth most common cancer in women and the sixth most common cancer in men.

Researchers are not sure about what causes histiocytic lymphoma. A weakened immune system may be one possible cause. Receiving an organ transplant may also put you at a greater risk for developing histiocytic lymphoma.

Swollen lymph nodes in your neck, groin or armpit may be the only signs and symptoms that you have in the early stages of histiocytic lymphoma. Later, as the disease progresses, there are a variety of signs and symptoms that you may experience depending on where the affected area is in your body. Some of these are:

  • Excessive sweating and night sweats
  • Coughing or shortness of breath if the disease is affecting your lymph nodes or thymus gland in your chest
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Headaches, seizures, difficulties with concentration or personality changes if the area affected is cells in your brain
  • Fever
  • Stomach swelling or pain that can lead to nausea, vomiting, constipation, and loss of appetite
  • Severe itching.

You or a loved one may have been diagnosed with histiocytic lymphoma. Histiocytic lymphoma and/or complications that have resulted from it or other ailments that you have in conjunction with this disease may have brought about you or your loved one’s disability and inability to work.

Because of this, you may need help. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may consider applying for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability that has come from histiocytic lymphoma and/or complications that have resulted from it or other illnesses that you have in conjunction with this disease. You may have already applied and been denied by the Social Security Administration.

 

If you or your loved one decides to reapply or appeal the denial, you really should carefully consider this important fact that you may not have heard of. It is an established fact that people who are represented by a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than people who do not have a disability lawyer fighting for them.

Please do not hesitate or put this off. This could mean so much to you or your loved one. Contact the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Angiomatoid Fibrous Histiocytoma and Receiving Social Security Disability

Your body is composed of 206 bones. Your bones help provide structure and shape to your body. Your bones help protect your fragile organs, contain bone marrow that stores and produces new blood cells and help control your body’s collection of various proteins and nutrients.

Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma is a rare disease that is evidenced by the formation of nodules under your skin. It is a tumor that is found in your soft tissues or bone. This tumor usually occurs in your limbs or trunk. However, it can begin in other parts of your body, also. There are cases of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma starting in the abdomen, muscles, kidneys and lungs.

Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma is regarded as a low-grade malignancy. This is because of its rare metastasis (spread to other areas of your body) and slow growth.

If angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma begins in your soft tissues, you may develop an enlarging painless mass. You may develop fractures if it starts in your bone

Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma occurs most often in young adults and children. 80% of the people with this disease are under the age of 30.

The exact cause of angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma is not known. Mutations (defects) occur in normal cells, but no one knows why this happens.

What is known is that research has shown that people with certain risk factors are more likely to have this disease than others without them. Some of these risk factors include:

  • Having had radiation treatment for cancer
  • Having a history of certain diseases like sickle cell disease, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, multiple myeloma or Hodgkin’s lymphoma
  • Having a history of Paget’s disease.

As mentioned above, you may have a broken bone or painless enlarging mass that will be the first sign or symptom that you experience with angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma. Other common signs and symptoms of this disease that you may have are:

  • Fever
  • Low blood sugar
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Nodules or a mass under your skin.

You need to take note of the fact that none of these signs and symptoms are exclusive to angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma. They may be indications of other medical disorders and conditions. Your doctor is the only one who can determine whether they are signs and symptoms of this disease.

You or a loved one may be afflicted with angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma. Angiomatoid fibrous histiocytoma and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other conditions that you have besides this disease may have led to you or your loved one’s disability and not being able to work.

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Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Receiving social Security Disability

Micrograph of Hodgkin lymphoma, abbreviated HL...

Image via Wikipedia

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is one of a group of cancers that are referred to as lymphomas. Lymphoma is a general term that is used for cancers that begin in your lymphatic system.

Your lymphatic system makes up a part of your body’s immune system. It aids your body in combating disease and infection.

Your lymphatic system is composed of a network of thin lymphatic vessels that branch, as your blood vessels do, into tissues throughout your body. Lymphatic vessels carry lymph, which is a colorless, watery fluid that contains infection-fighting cells that are known as lymphocytes.

Small organs that are called lymph nodes are located along this network of vessels. Clusters of these lymph nodes are situated in your groin, abdomen, chest, neck and underarms. Your tonsils, spleen, thymus and bone marrow are also a part of your lymphatic system. Lymphatic tissue is also found in your stomach, skin and intestines.

Your lymphatic system makes white blood cells that are called lymphocytes. These are important because they guard you from infectious invaders like bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Lymphoma occurs when your lymphocytes begin to multiply uncontrollably. They make malignant cells that have the abnormal ability to invade other tissues throughout your body.

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is one of the two main types of lymphoma. The other main type is non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. These are classified according to some unique characteristics of the cancer cells in each form.

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a rare kind of lymphoma. It accounts for only 1% of all the cases of cancer in the United States.

Many of the beginning signs and symptoms of Hodgkin’s lymphoma are like those of the flu. However, over a period of time, tumors will occur with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Other possible signs and symptoms include:

  • Night sweats
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unexplained recurrent chills and fevers
  • Persistent fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss that can be as much as 10% or more of your body weight
  • Itchy skin
  • Painless swelling of the lymph nodes in your armpits, neck or groin.

It is important not to wait for pain before you see your doctor when signs and symptoms like these are ongoing. This is because early Hodgkin’s lymphoma may not cause you any pain. Many people with Hodgkin’s lymphoma do not exhibit the classic signs and symptoms of the disease.

You or a loved one may have Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Hodgkin’s lymphoma and/or complications that have resulted from it or other ailments that you have in addition to this disease may have brought about you or your loved one’s disability and inability to work.

If this is the case, you may need assistance. You may need financial help.

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Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma and Receiving Social Security Disability

Your body is made up of 206 bones. Your bones help give shape and structure to your body. Your bones help protect your fragile organs, contain bone marrow that stores and makes new blood cells and help control your body’s collection of various nutrients and proteins.

Malignant fibrous histiocytoma is a rare disorder that involves a tumor that is found in your soft tissues or bone. This tumor usually develops in your arms or legs. However, it can start in other parts of your body, also. There are cases of malignant fibrous histiocytoma beginning in the kidneys, lungs, abdomen and muscles.

If malignant fibrous histiocytoma begins in your bone, you may have fractures. If it starts in your soft tissues, you may develop a painless enlarging mass.

Even though this disease is rare, it is the most common soft tissue cancer that is found in older adults. It is usually diagnosed in people between the ages of 50 and 70.

No one knows the exact cause of malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Something goes wrong with the DNA of normal cells that causes them to mutate or have errors, but no one knows what causes this to happen.

What is known is that research has revealed that people with certain risk factors are more likely to develop this disease than others without them. Some of these risk factors are:

  • Having a history of Paget’s disease
  • Having a history of certain other diseases like non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, multiple myeloma or sickle cell disease
  • Having had radiation treatment for cancer.

As already mentioned, you may have a painless enlarging mass or a broken bone as the first sign or symptom that you experience with malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Other common signs and symptoms of this disease that you may have include:

  • Low blood sugar
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Fever.

You should be aware of the fact that none of these signs and symptoms is exclusive to malignant fibrous histiocytoma. They can be indications of other medical conditions. Only your doctor can determine whether they are signs and symptoms of this disease.

You or a loved one may be suffering from malignant fibrous histiocytoma. This may be the reason for you or your loved one’s disability. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma may be why you are unable to work.

Have you or your loved one applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by malignant fibrous histiocytoma? Were you or your loved one denied?

If you appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration, do not ever forget this. People who are represented by a good disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than those people who do not have a lawyer.

Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and Receiving Social Security Disability

Lymphatic system
Image via Wikipedia

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is one of a group of cancers that are called lymphomas. Cancers that begin in your lymphatic system are called lymphomas.

Your lymphatic system is made up of a network of thin lymphatic vessels that branch into called tissues throughout your body like blood vessels. Lymphatic vessels carry a watery, colorless fluid called lymph. Lymph contains infection-fighting cells called lymphocytes. Small organs lymph nodes are along this network of vessels. Clusters of these lymph nodes are found in your chest, neck, underarms, abdomen and groin. Lymphatic tissue is found in your skin, intestines and stomach. Your spleen, bone marrow, tonsils and thymus are also a part of your lymphatic system.

Your lymphatic system produces white blood cells. These white blood cells are called lymphocytes. They do an important job of protecting you from infectious invaders like viruses, fungi and bacteria.

Lymphoma occurs when these lymphocytes begin to multiply uncontrollably. They produce malignant cells. They have the abnormal ability to invade other tissues throughout your body.

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is one of the two main types of lymphoma. The other main type is Hodgkin’s disease, also known as Hodgkin’s lymphoma. These are classified according to some special characteristics of the cancer cells in each type.

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is far more common than Hodgkin’s disease. Hodgkin’s disease represents only 1% of all the cases of cancer in the United States. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, however, is the sixth most common cancer in men, and the fifth most common cancer in women.

The only effect of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the early stages may be swollen lymph nodes in your groin, armpit or neck area. Later, the disease can cause a variety of effects depending on where the affected area is in your body. These include:

  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Severe itching
  • Fever
  • Night sweats and excessive sweating
  • Shortness of breath or coughing if the disease is affecting your lymph nodes or thymus gland in your chest
  • Seizures, headaches, personality changes or concentration problems if the area affected is cells in your brain
  • Stomach swelling or pain that can lead to constipation, vomiting, nausea and loss of appetite.

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma may be why you are disabled. This disease may be why you are in need of financial assistance.

Have you applied for financial help from the Social Security Administration for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma? Were you denied?

You may plan on appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do, remember this.

You may need the counsel of a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com in what can prove to be a long and arduous procedure. The reason why this is true is because people who are represented by a disability lawyer are approved more often than those people without an attorney.

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Hodgkin’s Disease and Receiving Social Security Disability

MADRID, SPAIN - FEBRUARY 24:  Actors Jennifer ...
Image by Getty Images via Daylife

Hodgkin’s disease is one of a group of cancers that are called lymphomas. Lymphoma is a general term for cancers that develop in your lymphatic system.

The lymphatic system is part of your body’s immune system. It helps your body fight infection and disease. Your lymphatic system is made up of a network of thin lymphatic vessels that branch, like your blood vessels, into tissues throughout your body. Lymphatic vessels carry lymph, a colorless, watery fluid that contains infection-fighting cells called lymphocytes.

Along this network of vessels are small organs called lymph nodes. Clusters of these lymph nodes are found in your neck, chest, abdomen, underarms and groin. Your spleen, bone marrow, tonsils and thymus are a part of your lymphatic system. Lymphatic tissue is also found in your skin, intestines and stomach.

Your lymphatic system produces white blood cells called lymphocytes. These are important because they help to protect you from infectious invaders like fungi, bacteria and viruses. Lymphoma develops when these lymphocytes begin to multiply uncontrollably. They produce malignant cells that have the abnormal ability to invade other tissues throughout your body.

Hodgkin’s disease is one of the two main types of lymphoma. The other main type is non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. These are classified according to some unique characteristics of the cancer cells in each type.

Hodgkin’s disease gets its name from a British doctor named Thomas Hodgkin. He first described this disorder in 1832. He also wrote down qualities of this disease that distinguish it from other lymphomas.

Hodgkin’s disease is also referred to as Hodgkin’s lymphoma. It is a rare kind of lymphoma. Hodgkin’s disease accounts for only 1% of all the cases of cancer in the United States.

Many of the beginning ways that Hodgkin’s disease may affect you are like that of the flu. In time, however, tumors will develop with Hodgkin’s disease. Other effects are:

  • Unexplained recurrent fevers and chills
  • Night sweats
  • Unexplained weight loss that can be as much as 10% or more of your body weight
  • Painless swelling of the lymph nodes in your groin, armpits or neck
  • Loss of appetite
  • Itchy skin
  • Persistent fatigue.

Because early Hodgkin’s disease may not cause pain, it is important not to wait for pain before you see your doctor.

You may have Hodgkin’s disease. You may need financial assistance.

You may have applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of your disability caused by Hodgkin’s disease. Were you denied?

If you plan to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration, you may need a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com to represent you in this process. The reason for this is because people who have a disability lawyer standing with them are approved more often than people who do not have an attorney.