Tag Archives: Immune system

Fournier’s Gangrene and Getting Social Security Disability

Can I get Social Security Disability for Fournier’s gangrene? If this is something you want to know, it is probably because you have this disease, and complications resulting from the disease and/or an underlying, condition along with the disease have caused you to be disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Getting Social Security Disability for Endometriosis

Can I get Social Security Disability for endometriosis? Although endometriosis is not usually a disease that would qualify you to get Social Security Disability, it may be that the disease or complications resulting from it and/or other debilitating conditions in addition to it have caused you to be disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Getting Social Security Disability for Eczema

Can I get Social Security Disability for eczema? If this is a question that you have, it is probably because you have eczema, and the disease and/or complications that have resulted from it or other debilitating conditions that you have in addition to it are the reason why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Anarthritic Syndrome and Receiving Disability Benefits

Anarthritic syndrome is a chronic, episodic, inflammatory autoimmune disease of your large arteries. Anarthritic syndrome is a poorly understood pain syndrome that is evidenced by pain and stiffness in your shoulder and hip girdles, neck, thighs and upper arms.  It is highly possible that if you suffer from this immune system syndrome you may qualify for social security disability benefits such as SSI or SSDI.

Anarthritic syndrome was probably first reported over 100 years ago with the name “senile rheumatic gout.” Other names were used until 1957.

There is a relationship between anarthritic syndrome and giant cell arteritis. Each of these disorders seem to have the same disease process with slightly different signs and symptoms. However, you can get one of them without getting the other.

The people who are most often affected by anarthritic syndrome are those who are over 50 years of age. Women are affected by this syndrome more than twice as often as men. Anarthritic syndrome is a relatively common problem in the United States and Europe.

Anarthritic syndrome is believed to be an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease is one in which your immune system for some unknown reason attacks the tissues and cells of your own body.

In the case of anarthritic syndrome, your immune system mistakenly attacks the lining of your joints with white blood cells. However, no one knows what causes your immune system to make this mistake. Researchers believe that both genetic and environmental factors are probably involved. There may also be a connection between this syndrome and some viruses that cause respiratory infections.

6 Signs and Symptoms of Anarthritic Syndrome

The signs and symptoms that you may experience with this type of autoimmune disease, anarthritic syndrome, often develop suddenly, without warning. They can literally begin overnight. Some of the signs and symptoms that you may have include:

Ÿ  A slight fever at various times

Ÿ  Unintentional weight loss

Ÿ  Anemia (low red blood cell count)

Ÿ  Weakness or malaise (not feeling well)

Ÿ  Moderate to severe aching, pain and stiffness in the muscles of your thighs, hips, shoulders, neck and upper arms

Ÿ  Fatigue.

The pain and stiffness may begin on one side of your body. You will probably be affected on both sides of your body as anarthritic syndrome progresses. The stiffness and pain is usually more severe in the morning or after you have been sitting or lying down for a long time. It may be severe enough to awaken you from sleep.  Please contact us or visit our other site pages for more information about receiving benefits for the autoimmune disease, anarthritic syndrome.

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MS and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Main symptoms of Multiple sclerosis. Sources a...

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MS (multiple sclerosis) is a chronic, potentially disabling disease of your central nervous system. Your central nervous system is composed of your spinal cord and brain.

Researchers believe that MS is an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune diseases are those in which your immune system for some unknown reason attacks the cells and tissues of your own body as if they were something foreign that is invading your body

In the case of MS, your autoimmune system mistakenly sends white blood cells and antibodies to attack the proteins in your myelin sheath. Your myelin sheath is a fatty substance that insulates nerve fibers in your spinal cord and brain. This results in inflammation and injury to your myelin sheath and ultimately to your nerves that your myelin sheath surrounds. This, in turn, may cause multiple areas of sclerosis (scarring). Eventually, this damage can slow or block your nerve signals that control your vision, muscle coordination, strength and sensation.

An estimated 300,000 people have MS in the United States and probably more than 1 million people around the world. Women are twice as likely as men to develop MS. Most people experience their first signs and symptoms between the ages of 20 and 40.

As stated earlier, MS is thought to be an autoimmune disease. Your autoimmune system mistakenly destroys the cells that make your myelin sheath. However, researchers do not know why your body’s immune system reacts like this.

 

Genetic factors may play a role in causing MS. Researchers also believe that a virus like a cold or flu may trigger episodes of your MS.

MS varies in severity and is unpredictable. MS can range anywhere from being relatively benign and mild, to a little disabling, to devastating with permanent disability.

The signs and symptoms that are produced by MS vary widely. They depend on where the nerve fibers are that are affected by the disease. Some of the signs and symptoms that you may experience are:

 

  • Dizziness
  • Blurring of your vision or double vision
  • Fatigue
  • Pain or tingling in parts of your body
  • Partial or complete loss of vision
  • Electric-shock sensations that happen when you make certain head movements
  • Numbness or weakness in one or more of your limbs
  • An unsteady gait in your walking
  • Tremor or lack of coordination.

 

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Diffuse Thyrotoxic Goiter and Receiving Social Security Disability

Hyperthyroidism

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Diffuse thyrotoxic goiter is the most common kind of hyperthyroidism (overactivity of your thyroid gland).  In fact, diffuse thyrotoxic goiter represents about 50 to 60% of the 500,000 people who are diagnosed with hyperthyroidism each year in the United States.

Diffuse thyrotoxic goiter is a disorder that may develop at any age to either women or men. However, diffuse thyrotoxic goiter is far more common in women than it is in men. This disorder usually starts after the age of 20.

Diffuse thyrotoxic goiter is a kind of autoimmune disorder that causes your thyroid gland to make too much of the hormone thyroxine. An autoimmune disorder is one where for some unknown reason your body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the cells and tissues of your own body. In the case of diffuse thyrotoxic goiter, your immune system makes antibodies that stimulate your thyroid to produce too much thyroxine.

As stated above, diffuse thyrotoxic goiter is believed to be an autoimmune disorder. However, researchers do not know what causes your immune system to attack your thyroid gland. They believe that several factors could be involved in causing your immune system to do this. Some of these factors include:

  • Age and stress
  • Sex
  • Sex hormones
  • Heredity.

In some cases, diffuse thyrotoxic goiter may not cause any signs or symptoms. However, there are many signs and symptoms that you may have with this disorder. The signs and symptoms that are caused by diffuse thyrotoxic goiter may develop slowly or occur suddenly. It is possible for these signs and symptoms to be confused with other medical conditions. Some of the possible signs and symptoms include:

  • Difficulty for a woman to get pregnant
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Changes in your vision or how your eyes look
  • Frequent bowel movements
  • Irritability
  • Lighter menstrual flow
  • Sensitivity to heat
  • Muscular weakness
  • Hand tremors
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Trouble sleeping.

Diffuse thyrotoxic goiter is the only kind of hyperthyroidism that involves the tissue around your eyes swelling and bulging of your eyes. In rare instances, you may have a reddish lumpy thickening of the skin in front of your shins that is known as pretibial myxedema. This condition is usually painless.

You or a loved one may be suffering from diffuse thyrotoxic goiter. Diffuse thyrotoxic goiter and/or complications that have been brought about by it or other conditions that you have along with this disorder may have caused you or your loved one’s disability and be the reason why you cannot work.

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Diffuse Scleroderma and Receiving Social Security Disability

A diagrammatic sectional view of the skin (mag...
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The word “scleroderma means “hardening of the skin”. Scleroderma refers to a group of diseases that cause abnormal growth of your connective tissue. These are the proteins that support your organs and skin. They are the fibers that provide the support and framework for your body. It is a rare, progressive disease that leads to hardening and tightening of your connective tissues and skin.

Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease of your connective tissue. Autoimmune diseases are illnesses in which your body’s tissues are attacked by your own immune system.

Scleroderma is generally classified as one of the autoimmune rheumatic diseases. These are diseases that are characterized by pain in your joints or muscles.

Scleroderma is divided into two main types, localized and systemic. Localized scleroderma affects only your skin. Systemic scleroderma affects your blood vessels and internal organs, as well as your skin.

Diffuse scleroderma is one of the two main kinds of systemic scleroderma. The other is limited scleroderma, which is also called CREST syndrome.

Diffuse scleroderma is the most aggressive and serious type of scleroderma. It usually involves a rapid development of thickening of your skin that starts with your face and hands and progresses to your trunk and arms. Diffuse scleroderma also may involve your internal organs at an early point in the course of the disease.

There are several signs and symptoms that you may experience with diffuse scleroderma. Some of these are:

  • Raynaud’s phenomenon – This is your toes and fingers losing circulation and turning white with exposure to cold.
  • Red swollen hands
  • Painful joints
  • Fatigue and/or unintentional weight loss
  • Morning stiffness
  • Thickening of your skin that starts as “puffiness” or swelling  of your hands and fingers
  • Shiny, hard and leathery skin that can be widespread and found on both sides of your body
  • Early internal organ involvement
  • Major depression.

You or a loved one may have diffuse scleroderma. This disease and/or complications resulting from it may be the reason why you or your loved one is not able to work. It may be the cause of your disability.

If this is true, you may need assistance. You may need financial help.

You or your loved one may be intending to apply for the financial assistance that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by diffuse scleroderma and/or complications resulting from this disease. Or, you or your loved one may have already tried this option and been denied by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is planning on appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration, here is something important that you should know. People who have a disability attorney working for them like the one you will find at Social Security Home are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability lawyer.

Connective Tissue Disease and Receiving Social Security Disability

Connective tissue disease refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders. Some of these conditions are inherited, and some are acquired.

A connective tissue disease is any disease that has the connective tissues of your body as a primary target of disease. Your connective tissues are the structural portions of your body. They essentially hold the cells of your body together. These connective tissues form a matrix, or framework for your body.

Your connective tissues are made up of two major structural protein molecules. These are elastin and collagen. Collagen protein comes in many different types and amounts in each of your body’s tissues. Elastin is like a rubber band or spring. It has the capability of stretching and returning to its original length. Elastin is the primary component of skin and ligaments. Ligaments are tissues that attach bone to bone in your body.

It is common for elastin and collagen to become injured by inflammation in people with connective tissue disease. This inflammation in your tissues is a result of your immune system attacking your own body tissues. When your immune system attacks your own body tissues it is called an autoimmune disease. When collagen is affected, it is also called collagen diseases.

There are many ways in which connective tissue disease may affect you. Some of these are:

  • A sunken or barrel chest
  • Migraine headaches
  • Back pain
  • Vertigo
  • Heart palpitations
  • Neck pain
  • Muscle cramps, especially in your calves
  • Depression, anxiety
  • Itching, sensitive skin
  • Insomnia
  • Rounded or frozen shoulders.

You or a loved one may have been diagnosed with some form of connective tissue disease. In fact, connective tissue disease and/or complications resulting from this disorder may be the reason for your disability. It may be why you are unable to work.

You or your loved one may need assistance, if this is the case. You may need financial help.

Who can you look to or turn to for the financial help that you need? Where will that help come from?

You or your loved one may have sought that help by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by connective tissue disease. You may be wondering what to do if you were denied by the Social Security Administration.

One thing that you or your loved one can do is to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do, here is something important to remember.

You or your loved one may need the advice and assistance of a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com in what can prove to be a long and trying procedure. This is true because claimants who are represented by a disability lawyer are approved more often than those people without an attorney.

Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Receiving Social Security Disability

Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a chronic, episodic, inflammatory disease of your large arteries. It is a poorly understood pain syndrome that is characterized by stiffness and pain in your hip and shoulder girdles, upper arms, thighs and neck.

Polymyalgia rheumatica was probably first reported over 100 years ago with the name “senile rheumatic gout.” Other names were used until 1957.

There is a relationship between polymyalgia rheumatica and giant cell arteritis. They each seem to have the same disease process with slightly different signs and symptoms. However, you can have one without having the other.

Polymyalgia rheumatica usually affects people who are over 50 years of age. Women are affected more than twice as much as women. It is a relatively common problem in the United States and Europe.

Polymyalgia rheumatica results when your immune system mistakenly attacks the lining of your joints with white blood cells. However, no one knows what causes your immune system to make this mistake. Researchers believe both environmental and genetic factors are probably involved. There may also be a connection between this disease and certain viruses that cause respiratory infections.

The signs and symptoms of polymyalgia rheumatica often appear suddenly, without warning. They can literally begin overnight. Some of the signs and symptoms that you may experience are:

  • Weakness or malaise (not feeling well)
  • Anemia (low red blood cell count)
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • A slight fever at various times
  • Moderate to severe stiffness, pain and aching in the muscles of your hips, shoulders, thighs, upper arms and neck.

Stiffness and pain may start on one side of your body. As the disease progresses, you will probably be affected on both sides of your body. The pain and stiffness is usually more severe after you have been lying or sitting down for a long time or in the morning. It may be bad enough to awaken you from sleep.

You or a loved one may be suffering from polymyalgia rheumatica. This disease may be why you or your loved one is disabled and not able to work.

As a result, you may need assistance. You or your loved one may need financial aid.

Where will it come from? Who can you turn to? Who can and will help you?

Do you or your loved one intend to apply for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by polymyalgia rheumatica and/or other conditions along with this disease? Did you already do this, and you or your loved one was turned down by the Social Security Administration?

If you or your loved one appeals the denial by the Social Security Administration, always remember this. People who are represented by a disability attorney like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than those people without a lawyer.

Please do not hesitate. Contact the disability attorney at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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Lupus and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

Lupus is a chronic, inflammatory disease in which your body’s immune system attacks your own tissues and organs. The inflammation caused by lupus may affect many of your different body systems. This includes your joints, kidneys, heart, skin, lungs and blood cells.

Women are more at risk for getting lupus than men, though it is not clear why. There are four types of lupus that exist:

  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Discoid lupus erythematosus
  • Drug-induced lupus erythematosus
  • Neonatal lupus.

The most serious and common form of lupus is systemic lupus erythematosus.

Lupus is a disease where no two cases are exactly alike. The effects caused by lupus may come on slowly or develop suddenly. They can be temporary or permanent, mild or severe. With most cases of lupus, people have episodes that are called “flares”. This is where there are times when their signs and symptoms get worse then eventually improve or even disappear completely for a period of time.

The way that you are affected by lupus will depend on which of your body systems are affected by the disease. Speaking in a general way, some of the signs and symptoms of lupus are:

  • Weight gain or loss
  • Stiffness, joint pain and swelling
  • Fever
  • Sores in your mouth
  • Fatigue
  • Skin lesions that develop or get worse with exposure to the sun
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • A butterfly-shaped rash on your face that covers the bridge of your nose and your cheeks
  • Your fingers and toes turn blue or white when you are exposed to cold or stress
  • Depression
  • Memory loss
  • Anxiety
  • Bruising easily
  • Having dry eyes.

You or a loved one may be suffering from lupus. Lupus may be the cause of you or your loved one’s disability. It may be the reason why you are unable to work.

If this is the case, do you or your loved one need help? Do you need financial help?

Where will you get the financial assistance that you need? Who will help you?

Have you or your loved one applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by lupus? Were you or your loved one denied?

You or your loved one may be thinking about appealing the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do, here is something that you need to think about.

You or your loved one will need to be represented by a disability attorney in this procedure. The reason why this is true is because people who are represented by a disability lawyer like the one you will find at disabilitycasereview.com are approved more often than those people who do not have an attorney.

Do not wait. This is something of great importance to you or your loved one. Contact the disability lawyer at disabilitycasereview.com, today.

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