Tag Archives: Inflammation

Enteropathic Arthritis and Getting Social Security Disability

Can I get Social Security Disability for enteropathic arthritis? If this is a question you have, it is probably because you have this disorder, and it and/or complications resulting from the disorder or other disabling ailments along with it have caused you to be disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Dermatitis and Getting Social Security Disability

Would I be eligible for Social Security Disability with dermatitis? You are probably asking this question because you are afflicted with dermatitis, and this disorder is so severe and/or complications resulting from it or other disabling conditions that you have along with it have caused you to be disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Cystic Bronchiectasis and Getting Social Security Disability

Will I be able to get Social Security Disability with cystic bronchiectasis? If you are asking this question, it is probably because you have this disease, and it and/or complications that have resulted from the disease or other disabling disorders that you have along it are why you are disabled, unable to work and in need of financial assistance.

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Degenerative Arthritis and Receiving Social Security Disability

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Degenerative arthritis is a medical condition that is marked by low-grade inflammation that results in pain in your joints. Degenerative arthritis results from abnormal wearing of the cartilage that covers and acts like a cushion for your joints.

Degenerative arthritis is the most common kind of arthritis. Nearly 21 million people in the United States are afflicted with degenerative arthritis. About 25% of all the visits to the doctor’s office are because of this condition. Degenerative arthritis also accounts for around 50% of all non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drug prescriptions.

There are two forms of degenerative arthritis. They are primary and secondary. Primary degenerative arthritis is a chronic degenerative condition that is related to aging, but it is not the result of aging. There are people well into their nineties who do not have any clinical or functional indications of degenerative arthritis. Secondary degenerative arthritis is due to other factors or diseases, but the medical results are the same as for primary degenerative arthritis.

Degenerative arthritis is also evidenced by the decrease or destruction of synovial fluid that lubricates your joints. You begin to experience pain upon weight bearing, including standing and walking, as your bone surfaces become not as well protected by cartilage. Your regional muscles may atrophy and your ligaments may become more lax because you have less movement due to the pain that you are experiencing.

Researchers believe that heredity may be a key factor in causing degenerative arthritis. This is because this condition often affects more than one member of the same family. Genetics play a role in the occurrence of degenerative arthritis, as well. There is also some evidence that allergies, whether fungal, infectious or systemically induced, may be a critical contributing factor in causing degenerative arthritis.

The hallmark sign or symptom of degenerative arthritis is chronic pain that leads to loss of mobility and possibly stiffness. The pain is usually evidenced by a burning sensation or a sharp ache in your surrounding tendons and muscles.

Degenerative arthritis can cause a crackling noise (called “crepitus”) as your affected joint is moved or touched, and you may have muscle spasm and contractions in your tendons.

At times, your joints may fill with fluid. Humid weather causes the pain to increase in many people. In theory, any joint in your body can be affected. However, degenerative arthritis usually affects your spine, hips, feet and hands.

You or a loved one may be afflicted with degenerative arthritis. Degenerative arthritis and/or complications that have been caused by it or other illnesses that you have besides this condition may have resulted in you or your loved one’s disability and inability to work.

If this is true, you may need assistance. You may need financial help.

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Cutaneous Vasculitis and Receiving Social Security Disability

Simplified diagram of the human Circulatory sy...

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Vasculitis is a large, inclusive term that is used in reference to a group of uncommon diseases that are marked by inflammation of your blood vessels. Your vascular system refers to the blood vessels of your body. Your blood vessels are made-up of arteries that carry oxygen-rich blood to your body’s tissues and veins that return oxygen-depleted blood from your tissues to your lungs for oxygen. Vasculitis is evidenced by damage to and inflammation in the walls of various blood vessels in your body.

Each one of this group of diseases is marked by distribution of blood vessel involvement, laboratory test abnormalities and certain patterns of particular organ involvement. As a group, these diseases are known as vasculitides.

Cutaneous vasculitis is the inflammation of blood vessels in your skin and subcutaneous tissue. Cutaneous vasculitis especially affects your small and medium-sized blood vessels. These are blood vessels like your capillaries, venules and arterioles.

There are three kinds of cutaneous vasculitis. They are acute, subacute and chronic.

Acute cutaneous vasculitis may damage your tissues and affected blood vessels. It can obstruct blood supply to your surrounding tissues and lead to tissue death.

Subacute cutaneous is usually less serious. It usually lasts for about a week.

Chronic cutaneous vasculitis is an ongoing disease. It is marked by the formation of papules and macules in parts of your body where blood vessels are dominant.

A common cause of cutaneous vasculitis is infection. Other possible causes are:

  • Various cancers
  • Allergy or hypersensitivity to drugs
  • Autoimmune diseases (these are diseases in which your body’s own immune system attacks your own cells)
  • Serum sickness.

There are several signs and symptoms that you may have with cutaneous vasculitis. Some of these are:

  • The formation of macules and papules, wheal or lump formations in your skin
  • Fever
  • A rash on the surface of your skin that forms small red blotches that are called petechiae or large bruises that are called ecchymosis
  • Redness
  • Pruritus or itching
  • Swelling of your lower legs.

You or a loved one may have cutaneous vasculitis. Cutaneous vasculitis and/or complications caused by this disease or the underlying condition that is responsible for it may have led to you or your loved one’s disability and inability to work.

If this is the case, you may need assistance. You may need financial help.

You or your loved one may be considering applying for the financial assistance that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by cutaneous vasculitis and/or complications resulting from this disease or the underlying condition that is responsible for it. You may have already tried this option, and your claim was turned down by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one has decided to reapply or appeal the denial, here is something important for you to think about. The fact is that people who are represented by a disability lawyer like the one you will find at Social Security Home are approved more often than people who do not have a disability attorney on their side.

Piriformis Syndrome and Receiving Social Security Disability

Nerves of right leg, anterior and posterior as...

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Your piriformis muscle is located deep inside of your buttock. Its function is to externally abduct (pull away) and rotate your thigh.

In most people, the piriformis muscle is located right above your sciatic nerve. Your sciatic nerve begins in your lower back and runs down the back of your leg.

Piriformis syndrome is a neuromuscular disorder that is characterized by inflammation and irritation of your sciatic nerve. When your piriformis muscle becomes swollen and inflamed, it may exert pressure on your sciatic nerve that causes it to become inflamed and irritated.

Women are much more likely to develop piriformis syndrome than men. Women have this disorder 6 times as often as men.

As mentioned above, in most people the sciatic nerve is underneath your piriformis muscle. However, in 15 to 30% of the population, the sciatic nerve runs through the substance of the piriformis muscle. These people have a higher incidence of piriformis syndrome than the general population.

Piriformis syndrome is caused by irritation or compression of your sciatic nerve by your piriformis muscle. There are several things that can cause this to happen. These include:

  • Difficulties related to your sacroiliac joints like overstress or stiffness
  • A rotational movement of your foot that is known as pronation
  • Being in involved in sports, activities or exercise that call for forward movements/postures of your body
  • Injury, trauma or stress in the area surrounding your piriformis muscle
  • A combination of weaker abductors and relatively stronger adductors
  • Overactive hip flexors and inactivation of gluteal muscles.

There are signs and symptoms that you may have that may be an indication of piriformis syndrome. Some of these are:

  • Chronic pain, numbness and tingling in your buttocks and the surrounding area
  • Pain that may spread to your lower back, thigh and the back of your calf and get worse with sports activities like running or cycling
  • Altered bowel habit
  • Pain that gets worse when your sciatic nerve is pressed against in activities like sitting
  • Pain when having sexual intercourse.

You or a loved one may have piriformis syndrome. Piriformis syndrome and complications that have resulted from and/or other disabling conditions that you may have along with this disorder may be the reason for you or your loved one’s disability and not being able to work.

Your may need help if this is true. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may be thinking about applying for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by piriformis syndrome and complications that have resulted from and/or other disabling conditions that you may have along with this disorder. You or your loved one may have already tried this option, and your claim was turned down by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one is considering reapplying or appealing the denial, always remember. People who are represented by a disability attorney are approved more often than people who do not have a disability lawyer fighting for them.

Please do not hesitate. Contact the disability advocate at Social Security Home, today.

Blepharitis and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

An infant with mild blepharitis (inflamed eyel...
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Your eyelid is a thin fold of skin that protects and covers your eye. Your eyelid has the thinnest skin on your body with the exception of the prepuce (fold of skin covering the head of the penis) and the labia minora (lips of the female external genitalia).

It is very important for the front surface of your cornea and eyeball to stay moist. When you are awake, your eyelids do this all-important work for you by sweeping the secretions of your tear gland (lacrimal) apparatus and other glands over the surface at regular intervals. When you are asleep, your eyelids cover your eyes to help prevent evaporation.

Your eyelids allow you to blink. This helps keep dust and dirt out of your eyes. Blinking also helps protect your eyes from injuries that are caused by foreign bodies. Your eyelashes, which are a fringe of short hairs that grow on the edge of your eyelids, serve as a screen that prevents insects and dust particles from getting in your eyes when your eyelids are partially closed.

Blepharitis is a chronic (long-term) disease that causes inflammation of your eyelids. It is a common inflammatory disease. Blepharitis is characterized by your eyelids being inflamed and becoming flaky and scaly.

There are two forms of blepharitis. Posterior blepharitis affects your inner eyelid that contacts your eye. Anterior blepharitis affects the outside front of your eyelid. This is where your eyelashes attach.

There are several different signs and symptoms that are associated with blepharitis. Some of these include:

  • Recurrent infections
  • Redness of your eye itself
  • Gritty (foreign body) feeling
  • Swollen or red eyelids
  • Watery eyes
  • Frothy tears
  • Misdirected eyelashes (eyelashes that grow abnormally)
  • Dry eyes
  • Flakes or crusting on your eye lashes
  • Blurred vision
  • Photophobia (sensitivity to light)
  • Loss of your eyelashes
  • Itching
  • Burning.

You or a loved one may have blepharitis. Blepharitis and/or complications that have resulted from this disease or other underlying conditions that you have along with it may have brought about you or your loved one’s disability and inability to work.

You may need help if this is your situation. You may need financial assistance.

You or your loved one may have decided to apply for the financial help that you need from the Social Security Administration by applying for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits because of the disability caused by blepharitis and/or complications that have resulted from this disease or other underlying conditions that you have along with it. You or your loved one may have already applied, and your claim was turned down by the Social Security Administration.

If you or your loved one intends to reapply or appeal the denial, think about this important fact. The fact is that people who have a disability lawyer in their corner like the one you will find at Social Security Home are approved more often than people who are not represented by a disability attorney.

Please do not hesitate. This is too important to you or your loved one. Contact us today.

Sacroiliitis and Receiving Social Security Disability Benefits

(1) sacrum, (2) ilium, (3) ischium, (4) pubis,...
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Sacroiliitis is an inflammation of either one or both of your sacroiliac joints that connect your lower spine to your pelvis.  Sacroiliitis occurs when your sacroiliac joint between the sacrum, or base or your spine, and ilium, or pelvic bone, becomes inflamed or infected.

Your sacroiliac joints (SI joints) have a limited range of motion when compared with other major joints in your body, such as your elbow or knee. With sacroiliitis, even the slightest movements of your spine can be extremely uncomfortable or even painful.

Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is another condition of the sacroiliac joint. It differs from sacroiliitis in that its origin is a disruption in the normal movement of the joint (too much or too little movement in the joint).

Sacroiliitis is a rheumatic disease. This means that it involves pain and inflammation in your joints or muscles.

Many of these rheumatic diseases are not limited to inflammation of your joints. They extend to other organs of your body, such as your lungs, kidneys, blood vessels, heart, skin, eyes and your nervous system.

There are several different things that can cause sacroiliitis. Some of these causes are:

  • Spondyloarthropathies, which include ankylosing spondylitis, arthritis that is associated with psoriasis and others
  • Pregnancy can also cause sacroiliitis because the pelvis has to stretch to enable childbirth
  • Heavy lifting, if your muscles are not properly prepared or you lift incorrectly
  • Infection of your sacroiliac joint that can be caused by bacteria in your food
  • Osteoarthritis of your spine
  • A sudden impact or traumatic injury like a fall or car accident.

There are several ways that you may be affected by sacroiliitis. These include:

  • Inflammation in one or both of your eyes
  • Psoriasis, which is an inflammation of your skin
  • Pain that affects your shoulders and hips
  • Diarrhea that is bloody
  • Stiffness and pain in your lower back, buttocks or thighs, especially when you have been sitting for long periods of time or when you get up in the morning
  • A low-grade fever that appears quickly
  • Pain that gets worse when you walk.

Sacroiliitis may be the reason that you or a loved one is unable to work. It may be the cause of your disability.

If this is so, you may need assistance. You may need financial help.

Have you or your loved one applied for Social Security disability benefits from the Social Security Administration because of the disability caused by sacroiliitis? Were you or your loved one denied?

You or your loved one may appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do, consider this.

You may need a disability lawyer like the one at Social Security Home to represent you in this process. This is true because people who are represented by a disability attorney are approved more often than those people without a lawyer.

Interstitial Nephritis and Receiving Social Security Disability

Interstitial nephritis is a disorder of your kidneys. It is a condition in which your tubules and the spaces between your kidney tubules, and the glomeruli become inflamed (swollen).

Your kidneys filter extra fluid and waste from your body. Interstitial nephritis reduces your kidneys ability to filter the way that they should.

Interstitial nephritis is also known by other names. It is also called tubulointerstitial nephritis; nephritis – interstitial; and, acute interstitial (allergic) nephritis.

Interstitial nephritis can be acute or temporary. It can also be chronic and get worse over time. The acute form is common in the United States. Interstitial nephritis is likely to be more severe and lead to chronic or permanent kidney damage in elderly people.

The acute form of interstitial nephritis is usually caused by an allergic reaction to drugs that you are taking for other conditions. In fact, anywhere from 71 to 92% of the cases are reported to be caused by allergic reaction to drugs.

It can be a side effect of certain antibiotics like penicillin, methicillin, ampicillin and sulfonamide medications. It can also be a side effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), furosemide and thiazide diuretics.

Infection and autoimmune diseases like lupus also cause interstitial nephritis. Analgesic nephropathy can cause this condition. Toxins that damage your kidneys are another cause of this disorder.

At times there are no signs or symptoms of interstitial nephritis, but when they do occur they are widely varied and can occur rapidly or gradually. When it is caused by allergic drug reaction, you may have effects like fever, rash and enlarged kidneys.

With chronic interstitial nephritis you may have nausea, vomiting, fatigue and weight loss. You may also be affected by painful urination and lower back pain. Other possible signs and symptoms that you may experience are:

  • Blood in your urine
  • Weight gain from retaining fluid
  • Swelling in any area of your body.

You or a loved one may have interstitial nephritis. This disorder and conditions that have caused or resulted from it may be why you or your loved one is disabled.

If this is the case, you or your loved one may need assistance. You may need financial aid.

Have you or your loved one applied for Social Security disability benefits or disability benefits from the Social Security Administration? Were you or your loved one denied?

You or your loved one may decide to appeal the denial by the Social Security Administration. If you do, think about this.

You or your loved one will need an established disability lawyer like the one you will find at Social Security Home to counsel and guide you in what can be a long and trying process. The reason why this is true is because people who have an experienced disability attorney on their side are approved more often than those people who do not have a lawyer.